No Longer a Match: Trends in Radiation Oncology National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) Data from 2010-2020 and Comparison Across Specialties.

Published on Mar 11, 2021in International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics5.859
· DOI :10.1016/J.IJROBP.2021.03.006
Chelain R. Goodman13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center),
Chelain R. Goodman (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)+ 10 AuthorsShauna R. Campbell4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Cleveland Clinic)
Source
Abstract
Abstract Purpose To report trends in the number and types of applicants and matched trainees to radiation oncology in comparison to other specialties participating in the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) between 2010-2020. Methods Data from the NRMP and Electronic Residency Application System (ERAS) were obtained for 18 medical specialties between 2010-2020. Number and type of applicants and matched trainees relative to available positions in the NRMP and Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) were assessed. Results In the 2020 NRMP, 122 US MD senior graduates preferentially ranked radiation oncology, a significant decrease from 2010-2019 (Median [Interquartile Range],187 [170-192], p 99% (n=127 of 128) of US senior applicants successfully matching in the 2020 NRMP, 16 of 24 remaining unfilled positions were filled via the SOAP. Radiation oncology was the top utilizer of the 2020 SOAP, filling 15% of total positions versus a median of 0.9% [0.3-2.3%] across all specialties (p Conclusions Supply of radiation oncology residency positions now far exceeds demand by graduating US medical students. Efforts to nullify a market correction revealed by medical student behavior via continued reliance on the SOAP to fill historical levels of training positions may not be in the best of interest of trainees, individual programs, or the specialty as a whole.
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Abstract Purpose Radiation oncology has been facing an evolving crisis in recruitment for several years, and the events of 2020 to 2021 will certainly add to that crisis with the urgency of addressing systemic racial injustice amid a global pandemic. The purpose of this study is to examine applicant data to gain insight on residency match trends and evaluate these findings within the backdrop of a novel match year. Methods and Materials National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) data between 200...
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PURPOSE To quantify how the quality of US medical students accepted to radiation oncology (RO) training programs, as defined by National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) metrics, has changed over time. METHODS AND MATERIALS We examined NRMP data of senior US medical students matched into RO training programs from 2007 to 2018. Metrics include United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 1 and 2-Clinical Knowledge scores, research output, percentage with PhD, and percentage in Alpha Omega Al...
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Background Although specific specialties and residency programs have investigated student performance factors affecting matching, there is a paucity of information from medical schools. Furthermore, factors contributing to matching into first-choice residency have not been examined. This study aimed to identify academic performance factors affecting matching into first-choice residency and highly competitive specialties.
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Purpose A significant physician shortage has been projected to occur by 2025, and demand for oncologists is expected to outpace supply to an even greater degree. In response to this, many have called to increase the number of radiation oncology residency positions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) data for the number of residency positions between 2004 and 2015 as well as the number and caliber of applicants for those positions and to compare rad...
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National Residency Matching Program Results for Radiation Oncology: 2012 Update Sanjay Aneja, BS,* Lynn D. Wilson, MD, MPH,*,y Bruce G. Haffty, MD,z,x and James B. Yu, MD*,y,k *Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, and yYale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut; zDepartment of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and xCancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey; and kCancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER...
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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE There is evidence of practice consolidation in US healthcare in recent years. To our knowledge, a detailed quantitative study of recent changes in radiation oncology practice size has not been performed. We aim to evaluate radiation oncology practice size changes between 2012 and 2020 in the US. MATERIALS AND METHODS Using the Medicare Physician Compare Database, we identified practices employing radiation oncologists using their Taxpayer Identification Number and individu...
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