The comparability of intelligence test results: Group- and individual-level comparisons of seven intelligence tests.

Published on Sep 27, 2021in Journal of School Psychology4.292
· DOI :10.1016/J.JSP.2021.09.002
Anette Bünger1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Basel),
Silvia Grieder2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Basel)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexander Grob29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Basel)
Source
Abstract
Abstract null null A significant body of research has demonstrated that IQs obtained from different intelligence tests substantially correlate at the group level. Yet, there is minimal research investigating whether different intelligence tests yield comparable results for individuals. Examining this issue is paramount given that high-stakes decisions are based on individual test results. Consequently, we investigated whether seven current and widely used intelligence tests yielded comparable results for individuals between the ages of 4–20 years. Results mostly indicated substantial correlations between tests, although several significant mean differences at the group level were identified. Results associated with individual-level comparability indicated that the interpretation of exact IQ scores cannot be empirically supported, as the 95% confidence intervals could not be reliably replicated with different intelligence tests. Similar patterns also appeared for the individual-level comparability of nonverbal and verbal intelligence factor scores. Furthermore, the nominal level of intelligence systematically predicted IQ differences between tests, with above- and below-average IQ scores associated with larger differences as compared to average IQ scores. Analyses based on continuous data confirmed that differences appeared to increase toward the above-average IQ score range. These findings are critical as these are the ranges in which diagnostic questions most often arise in practice. Implications for test interpretation and test construction are discussed.
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Intelligence tests produce composite scores that are interpreted as indexes of psychometric g. Like all measures, general intelligence composites are not pure representations of their intended construct, so it is important to evaluate the score characteristics that affect accuracy in measurement. In this study, we identified three characteristics of general intelligence composite scores that vary across intelligence tests, including the number, the g loadings, and the heterogeneity of contributi...
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Clinical cognitive ability assessment—and its corollary, score interpretation—are in a state of disarray. Many current instruments are designed to provide a bevy of scores to appeal to a variety of school psychologists. These scores are not all grounded in the attribute’s theory or developed from sound measurement or psychometric theory. Thus, for a given instrument, there can be substantial variation between school psychologists when interpreting scores from the same instrument. This is contrar...
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#2Sakari Lemola (Warw.: University of Warwick)H-Index: 28
Last. Alexander Grob (University of Basel)H-Index: 29
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Numerous intelligence tests are available to psychological diagnosticians to assess children’s intelligence, but whether they yield comparable test results has been little studied. We examined test scores of 206 typically developing children aged 6 to 11 years on five German intelligence tests (Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales; Snijders Oomen Nonverbal Intelligence Test; Intelligence and Development Scales; Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th edition; Culture Fair Intelligence T...
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