From NAFLD to MAFLD: Nurse and allied health perspective

Published on Jan 16, 2021in Liver International5.175
· DOI :10.1111/LIV.14788
Michelle Clayton4
Estimated H-index: 4
(St James's University Hospital),
Núria Fabrellas13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Barcelona)
+ 5 AuthorsD Attia11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Beni-Suef University)
Sources
Abstract
Fatty liver disease associated with metabolic dysfunction is the most prevalent liver disease worldwide, though both patient and health professional still lack awareness of it. An international consensus panel has produced what is sure to be an influential report renaming the disease from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to metabolic (dysfunction) associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) and suggesting how the disease should be diagnosed. This viewpoint explores the call from the perspective of nurse and allied health practitioners. This group have raised serious concerns on the existing nomenclature, which labels the disease as NAFLD, and its diagnostic criteria, including provoking nurse role confusion and representing a major barrier to various key aspects; patient-nurse communications, patient awareness, partnership working, motivation of patients to undertake lifestyle changes and multiple health behaviour change promotion and nurse-led clinics. Therefore, they are enthusiastically supportive of this call to reframe the disease that we believe will ultimately have a positive impact on nurse-patient communication, and through this, improving patient care and quality of life and reduce burden on health system.
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