Resonant collisional shielding of reactive molecules using electric fields.

Published on Dec 11, 2020in Science47.728
· DOI :10.1126/SCIENCE.ABE7370
Kyle Matsuda9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NIST: National Institute of Standards and Technology),
Luigi De Marco15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIST: National Institute of Standards and Technology)
+ 4 AuthorsJun Ye126
Estimated H-index: 126
(NIST: National Institute of Standards and Technology)
Sources
Abstract
Full control of molecular interactions, including reactive losses, would open new frontiers in quantum science. We demonstrate extreme tunability of ultracold chemical reaction rates by inducing resonant dipolar interactions by means of an external electric field. We prepared fermionic potassium-rubidium molecules in their first excited rotational state and observed a modulation of the chemical reaction rate by three orders of magnitude as we tuned the electric field strength by a few percent across resonance. In a quasi–two-dimensional geometry, we accurately determined the contributions from the three dominant angular momentum projections of the collisions. Using the resonant features, we shielded the molecules from loss and suppressed the reaction rate by an order of magnitude below the background value, thereby realizing a long-lived sample of polar molecules in large electric fields.
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202047.73Science
1 Author (Yury Suleymanov)
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The control of molecules is key to the investigation of quantum phases, in which rich degrees of freedom can be used to encode information and strong interactions can be precisely tuned1. Inelastic losses in molecular collisions2-5, however, have greatly hampered the engineering of low-entropy molecular systems6. So far, the only quantum degenerate gas of molecules has been created via association of two highly degenerate atomic gases7,8. Here we use an external electric field along with optical...
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We propose a method to suppress the chemical reactions between ultracold bosonic ground-state ^{23}a^{87}b molecules based on optical shielding. By applying a laser with a frequency blue-detuned from the transition between the lowest rovibrational level of the electronic ground state X^1\Sigma^+ (v_X=0, j_X=0) and the long-lived excited level b^3\Pi (v_b=0, j_b=1) we can engineer the long-range dipole-dipole interaction between the colliding molecules, leading to a dramatic suppressi...
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