Designing learner-centred text-based feedback: a rapid review and qualitative synthesis

Published on Oct 8, 2020in Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
· DOI :10.1080/02602938.2020.1828819
Tracii Ryan12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Melbourne),
Michael Henderson19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Monash University, Clayton campus)
+ 1 AuthorsGregor Kennedy31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Melbourne)
Sources
Abstract
Current conceptualisations of feedback contend that it should be a learner-centred process. In practice, however, text-based feedback comments from teachers are a convenient and common source of fe...
References60
Newest
#1Elizabeth Molloy (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 29
#2David Boud (Deakin University)H-Index: 77
Last. Michael Henderson (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 19
view all 3 authors...
AbstractThere is an increasing focus on notions of feedback in which students are positioned as active players rather than recipients of information. These discussions have been either conceptual i...
40 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth Molloy (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 29
#2Rola Ajjawi (Deakin University)H-Index: 21
Last. Anna Ryan (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 6
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Context: Research suggests that feedback in the health professions is less useful than we would like. In this paper, we argue that feedback has become reliant on myths that perpetuate unproductive rituals. Feedback often resembles a discrete episode of an educator “telling,” rather than an active and iterative involvement of the learner in a future‐facing process. With this orientation towards past events, it is not surprising that learners become defensive or disengaged when they are reminded o...
25 CitationsSource
#1Michael Henderson (Monash University)H-Index: 19
#2Michael Phillips (Monash University)H-Index: 11
Last. Paige Mahoney (Deakin University)H-Index: 5
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ABSTRACTDespite an increasing focus on assessment feedback, educators continue to find that simply replicating an effective feedback practice from one context does not guarantee success in the next...
20 CitationsSource
#1Tracii Ryan (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
#2Michael HendersonH-Index: 19
Last. Michael PhillipsH-Index: 11
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Assessment feedback is increasingly being provided in digital modes, from electronic annotations to digital recordings. Digitally recorded feedback is generally considered to be more detailed than text‐based feedback. However, few studies have compared digital recordings with other common feedback modes, including non‐digital forms such as face‐to‐face conversations. It is also unclear whether providing multiple feedback modes is better than a single mode. To explore these possibilities, an onli...
13 CitationsSource
#1Naomi Winstone (University of Surrey)H-Index: 15
#2David Boud (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 77
ABSTRACTIn recent years, there have been calls in the literature for the dominant model of feedback to shift away from the transmission of comments from marker to student, towards a more dialogic f...
23 CitationsSource
#1Phillip Dawson (Deakin University)H-Index: 17
#2Michael Henderson (Monash University)H-Index: 19
Last. Elizabeth Molloy (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 29
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AbstractSince the early 2010s the literature has shifted to view feedback as a process that students do where they make sense of information about work they have done, and use it to improve the quality of their subsequent work. In this view, effective feedback needs to demonstrate effects. However, it is unclear if educators and students share this understanding of feedback. This paper reports a qualitative investigation of what educators and students think the purpose of feedback is, and what t...
95 CitationsSource
#1Teresa Guasch (Open University of Catalonia)H-Index: 9
#2Anna Espasa (Open University of Catalonia)H-Index: 9
Last. Montserrat Martinez-Melo (Autonomous University of Barcelona)H-Index: 3
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AbstractResearch on feedback has focused more on generating feedback rather than on how students use it and implement it; that is, what type of cognitive, metacognitive or affective activity studen...
8 CitationsSource
#1Rola Ajjawi (Deakin University)H-Index: 21
#2David Boud (Middlesex University)H-Index: 77
Last. Elizabeth Molloy (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 29
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This chapter discusses researching feedback inputs and processes to examine effects. Specifically, we promote a research agenda that contributes an understanding of how feedback works, for particular learners, in particular circumstances through research designs that take account of theory, occur in naturalistic settings and focus on students’ sense-making and actions. We draw attention to categories of research on effects of feedback: a) task-related performance/work; b) meta-learning processes...
3 CitationsSource
#1Michael Henderson (Monash University)H-Index: 19
#2Rola Ajjawi (Deakin University)H-Index: 21
Last. Elizabeth Molloy (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 29
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This chapter offers new insight regarding the theoretical, methodological and practical concerns relating to feedback in higher education. It begins with the construction of a new definition of feedback. We explain how feedback is a learner-centred process in which impact is a core feature. The chapter then explores the reasons why identifying, let alone measuring, impact is problematic. We briefly revisit the contingent nature of educational research into cause and effect and question the impli...
11 CitationsSource
#1Joanna Tai (Deakin University)H-Index: 6
#2Rola Ajjawi (Deakin University)H-Index: 21
Last. Ernesto Panadero (UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)H-Index: 26
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Evaluative judgement is the capability to make decisions about the quality of work of oneself and others. In this paper, we propose that developing students’ evaluative judgement should be a goal of higher education, to enable students to improve their work and to meet their future learning needs: a necessary capability of graduates. We explore evaluative judgement within a discourse of pedagogy rather than primarily within an assessment discourse, as a way of encompassing and integrating a rang...
152 CitationsSource
Cited By3
Newest
#1James Wood (SNU: Seoul National University)H-Index: 1
In recent years, academic and practitioner attention to improving attainment as a result of feedback, as well as satisfaction with it, has led to a conceptualisation of feedback that considers lear...
Source
#1Tracii Ryan (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 12
#2Michael Henderson (Monash University)H-Index: 19
Last. Gregor Kennedy (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Due to recent conceptual shifts towards learner-centred feedback, there is a potential gap between research and practice. Indeed, few models or studies have sought to identify or evaluate which sem...
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#1Rola Ajjawi (Deakin University)H-Index: 21
#2Fiona Kent (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 2
Last. David Boud (UTS: University of Technology, Sydney)H-Index: 77
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Despite feedback being considered important to learning, its potential is rarely fully realised. Promoting learning through feedback in open-ended written tasks (e.g. essays and reports) is a compl...
1 CitationsSource