Membership status, social exclusion, and regulatory focus

Published on Jun 12, 2020in Social Science Journal
· DOI :10.1080/03623319.2020.1760073
Katherine E. Adams2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Purdue University),
James M. Tyler11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Purdue University)
Source
Abstract
Previous work suggests that being socially excluded can influence people’s regulatory focus motivations (i.e., promotion and prevention). In the current work, we extend past findings and further ex...
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Violating one’s expectations of inclusion may influence the pain of rejection. This is supported by neurological evidence on expectation violation processing (Somerville, Heatherton, & Kelley, 2006). We asked: Can an expectation of a specific social outcome affect how it feels to be rejected or included? We tested the premise that expectations for the outcome of an interaction are derived from social information. Participants were either liked or disliked following a get-acquainted exercise (Stu...
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Ostracism (being ignored and excluded) and other forms of interpersonal rejection threaten individuals' physical and psychological well-being (Williams and Nida, 2011). Researchers often use the terms ostracism, social exclusion, and rejection interchangeably, but there are theoretical and empirical debates about the differential effects of these phenomena (Smart Richman and Leary, 2009; Williams, 2009; Bernstein and Claypool, 2012). We acknowledge these debates but choose to use the term ostrac...
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