Differences by gender at twelve months in a brief intervention trial among Mexican-origin young adults in the emergency department.

Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse1.188
· DOI :10.1080/15332640.2015.1095667
Judith Bernstein28
Estimated H-index: 28
(BU: Boston University),
Edward Bernstein30
Estimated H-index: 30
(BU: Boston University)
+ 8 AuthorsRebeca Ramos15
Estimated H-index: 15
Sources
Abstract
ABSTRACTIn this study, we investigate the role of gender in prevalence and consequences of binge drinking and brief intervention outcomes among Mexican-origin young adults aged 18–30 years at the U.S.-Mexico border. We conducted a secondary analysis, stratified by gender, from a randomized controlled trial of a brief motivational intervention in a hospital emergency department. Intervention effects for males included reductions in drinking frequency, binge drinking, and alcohol-related consequences. For females the intervention was associated with reduction in drinking frequency and binge drinking but did not have a significant effect on alcohol-related consequences. Results suggest a new direction for tailoring interventions to gender.
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AIMS: A randomized controlled trial of brief intervention (BI), for drinking and related problems, using peer health promotion advocates (promotores), was conducted among at-risk and alcohol-dependent Mexican-origin young adult emergency department (ED) patients, aged 18-30. METHODS: Six hundred and ninety-eight patients were randomized to: screened only (n = 78), assessed (n = 310) and intervention (n = 310). Primary outcomes were at-risk drinking and Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen (RAPS4) score...
10 CitationsSource
#1Emily E. Tanner-Smith (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 30
#2Mark W. Lipsey (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 57
Abstract This study reports findings from a meta-analysis summarizing the effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions for adolescents (age 11–18) and young adults (age 19–30). We identified 185 eligible study samples using a comprehensive literature search and synthesized findings using random-effects meta-analyses with robust standard errors. Overall, brief alcohol interventions led to significant reductions in alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems among adolescents ( g ¯ = 0.27 and...
237 CitationsSource
#1Britain A. Mills (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 19
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BACKGROUND: Rates of alcohol-related outcomes are sensitive to policy differences in politically distinct, adjacent territories. Factors that shape these cross-border effects, particularly when the policy differences are longstanding, remain poorly understood. We compared the ability of 2 classes of variables with theoretical relevance to the U.S.-Mexico border context-bar attendance and alcohol-related social-cognitive variables-to explain elevated drinking on the U.S. side of the border relati...
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BACKGROUND: This paper examines the prevalence, the symptom profile, and the drinking and sociodemographic predictors of current (past 12 months) DSM-IV alcohol abuse and dependence among Mexican Americans living along the U.S.-Mexico border and those living in metropolitan areas away from the border. METHODS: Respondents in the non-border areas (primarily Houston and Los Angeles) constitute a multistage probability sample (N = 1,288) of these areas, interviewed as part of the 2006 Hispanic Amer...
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#2Steve Martino (Yale University)H-Index: 35
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Abstract Brief intervention (BI) can reduce harmful and hazardous drinking among emergency department patients. However, no psychometrically-validated instrument for evaluating the extent to which practitioners correctly implement BIs in clinical practice (e.g., adherence) exists. We developed and subsequently examined the psychometric properties of a scale that measures practitioner adherence to a BI, namely the Brief Negotiation Interview (BNI). Ratings of 342 audiotaped BIs in the emergency d...
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Study objective Brief interventions have been shown to reduce alcohol use and improve outcomes in hazardous and harmful drinkers, but evidence to support their use in emergency department (ED) patients is limited. The use of research assessments in studies of brief interventions may contribute to uncertainty about their effectiveness. Therefore we seek to determine (1) if an emergency practitioner-performed Brief Negotiation Interview or a Brief Negotiation Interview with a booster reduces alcoh...
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Abstract This paper examines alcohol-related social problems among Mexican Americans living along the U.S.–Mexico border and in non-border areas. Interviews were conducted among Mexican Americans in the border regions of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas (N = 1307). Non-border respondents were interviewed primarily in Houston and Los Angeles (N = 1288) as part of the Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS). Both the border and HABLAS surveys employed multistage cluster sampl...
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#1Raul Caetano (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 83
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Background: This paper examines differences in drinking and binge drinking between Mexican Americans living along the U.S.-Mexico border and those living in 2 metropolitan areas away from the border (Houston, Texas and Los Angeles, California). Methods: Respondents in the non-border area (Houston and Los Angeles) constitute a multistage probability sample (N = 1,288), who were interviewed as part of the 2006 Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS). Respondents in the border area (N =...
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