A Longitudinal Investigation of the Role of Quantity and Quality of Child-Directed Speech in Vocabulary Development

Published on Sep 1, 2012in Child Development5.899
· DOI :10.1111/J.1467-8624.2012.01805.X
Meredith L. Rowe35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Sources
Abstract
Quantity and quality of caregiver input was examined longitudinally in a sample of 50 parent–child dyads to determine which aspects of input contribute most to children’s vocabulary skill across early development. Measures of input gleaned from parent–child interactions at child ages 18, 30, and 42 months were examined in relation to children’s vocabulary skill on a standardized measure 1 year later (e.g., 30, 42, and 54 months). Results show that controlling for socioeconomic status, input quantity, and children’s previous vocabulary skill; using a diverse and sophisticated vocabulary with toddlers; and using decontextualized language (e.g., narrative) with preschoolers explains additional variation in later vocabulary ability. The differential effects of various aspects of the communicative environment at several points in early vocabulary development are discussed.
Download
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
References44
Newest
#1Janellen Huttenlocher (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 70
#2Heidi Waterfall (Cornell University)H-Index: 11
Last. Larry V. Hedges (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 95
view all 5 authors...
The present longitudinal study examines the role of caregiver speech in language development, especially syntactic development, using 47 parent-child pairs of diverse SES background from 14 to 46 months. We assess the diversity (variety) of words and syntactic structures produced by caregivers and children. We use lagged correlations to examine language growth and its relation to caregiver speech. Results show substantial individual differences among children, and indicate that diversity of earl...
Source
#1Meredith L. Rowe (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 35
#2Susan Goldin-Meadow (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 97
Children from low–socioeconomic status (SES) families, on average, arrive at school with smaller vocabularies than children from high-SES families. In an effort to identify precursors to, and possible remedies for, this inequality, we videotaped 50 children from families with a range of different SES interacting with parents at 14 months and assessed their vocabulary skills at 54 months. We found that children from high-SES families frequently used gesture to communicate at 14 months, a relation...
Source
This paper presents the foundations of contrast analysis as a method for examining change. Contrast analysis is a relatively high-powered, simple, and informative procedure for evaluating hypotheses about specific patterns of change. This paper reviews the general purpose and nature of contrast analysis, it discusses some of the advantages of contrast analysis as a method for examining change, it provides a conceptual overview of the relevant statistical procedures, it illustrates the approach b...
Source
#1Ron Dumont (Fairleigh Dickinson University)H-Index: 33
#2John O. Willis (Rivier University)H-Index: 34
Source
#1Meredith L. Rowe (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 35
This study sought to determine why American parents from different socioeconomic backgrounds communicate in different ways with their children. Forty-seven parent–child dyads were videotaped engaging in naturalistic interactions in the home for ninety minutes at child age 2 ; 6. Transcripts of these interactions provided measures of child-directed speech. Children's vocabulary comprehension skills were measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test at 2 ; 6 and one year later at 3 ; 6. Resul...
Source
#1Rachel E. Durham (Johns Hopkins University)H-Index: 5
#2George Farkas (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 62
Last. Hugh W. Catts (KU: University of Kansas)H-Index: 60
view all 5 authors...
Abstract In this paper we test whether oral language development during the preschool years helps explain the positive relationship between family socioeconomic status (SES) and children's elementary school performance. In particular, we test for the portion of the SES effect on 2nd to 4th grade reading, 3rd to 4th grade mathematics, and overall teacher-rated performance that is explained by oral language ability measured when kindergarten begins. We analyze a unique data set containing unusuall...
Source
#1Erika Hoff (FAU: Florida Atlantic University)H-Index: 33
Abstract The human potential for language is based in human biology but makes requirements of the social environment to be realized. This paper reports evidence regarding (1) the nature of those environmental requirements, (2) the ways in which the varied social contexts in which children live meet those requirements, and (3) the effects of environmental variability in meeting those requirements on the course of language development. The evidence suggests that all human environments support lang...
Source
#1George Farkas (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 62
#2Kurt J. Beron (UTD: University of Texas at Dallas)H-Index: 18
Abstract Data from the Children of the NLSY79 (CNLSY) are pooled together across survey waves, 1986–2000, to provide an unusually large sample size, as well as two or more observations at different time points for many children, recorded at single months of age between 36 and 156 months. We fit a variety of multilevel growth models to these data. We find that by 36 months of age, large net social class and Black–White vocabulary knowledge gaps have already emerged. By 60 months of age, when kind...
Source
#1Erika Hoff (FAU: Florida Atlantic University)H-Index: 33
The hypothesis was tested that children whose families differ in socioeconomic status (SES) differ in their rates of productive vocabulary development because they have different language-learning experiences. Naturalistic interaction between 33 high-SES and 30 mid-SES mothers and their 2-year-old children was recorded at 2 time points 10 weeks apart. Transcripts of these interactions provided the basis for estimating the growth in children’s productive vocabularies between the first and second ...
Source
#1Erika HoffH-Index: 33
Cited By556
Newest
#1Francesca A. Scheiber (UI: University of Iowa)
#2Kelli K. Ryckman (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 31
Last. Ö. Ece Demir-Lira (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
BACKGROUND Up to 1 in 5 children are exposed to maternal depressive symptoms. Children exposed to maternal depressive symptoms have poorer language skills than children not exposed to maternal depressive symptoms. Due to the crucial role of children's language skills in school readiness and academic achievement, it is imperative to understand the factors that underlie the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and children's language skills. Previous reviews have examined the mechanistic ...
Source
#1Yunus Pinar (Akdeniz University)
#2Fatma Ünal (Akdeniz University)H-Index: 5
Last. Nihal Kubilay Pınar (Akdeniz University)H-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
In this study, we examine the mother tongue proficiency of pre-school children from high-income and highly educated families in Antalya, Turkey. The study used the Turkish version of the Hamburger Instrument for the Analysis of the Language Level of 5-year olds (HAVAS 5) linguistic-level diagnostic tool that is originally employed to form the basis of individually customized language support programs. The study group of this research was made up of 41 pre-school children (n= 41; 29 boys, 12 girl...
Source
#1Seunghee Ha (Hallym University)H-Index: 8
#2Kimbrough D. Oller (U of M: University of Memphis)
OBJECTIVE This study investigated vocalization and language environment longitudinally in infants with cleft palate (CP) based on day-long audio recordings collected in their natural environments. DESIGN Language Environment Analysis (LENA) data from all-day recordings at home were collected at 3-month intervals for infants from 4-6 to 16-18 months of age. The recordings were analyzed using experimentally blinded human coding as well as LENA automated analysis. PARTICIPANTS Ten infants with CP (...
Source
Source
#1Katherine G. Hanson (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 8
#2Heather J. LavigneH-Index: 3
Last. Daniel R. Anderson (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 50
view all 4 authors...
Abstract null null This study compares parent language directed at their toddlers while coviewing toddler-directed television and while storybook reading. Participants were 15- or 30- month-old children and their parent. A quantitative analysis of parent language revealed that it is more frequent, rich, and complex during reading relative to television viewing regardless of child age; although parents used more complex language and more diverse words with older children. The difference between m...
Source
Source
#1Louisa Brenner (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Risa Brudney (U of C: University of Chicago)
Last. Dana L. SuskindH-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
In this study, we aimed to create a novel tool to assist providers at 2 Chicago-area Federally Qualified Health Centers in giving guidance on early cognitive and language development during well-child visits. We utilized a human-centered design (HCD) process to address specific barriers to providing this guidance and create a tool shaped by the needs of providers and parents. Phase I involved collaborative prototype design; phase II involved implementation, feedback gathering, and responsive ite...
Source
#1Sahar Borairi (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 2
#2Pasco Fearon (UCL: University College London)H-Index: 30
Last. Jennifer Jenkins (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 70
view all 5 authors...
This meta-analysis tested maternal responsivity as a mediator of the association between socioeconomic risk and children's preschool language abilities. The search included studies up to 2017 and meta-analytic structural equation modeling, allowed us to examine the magnitude of the indirect effect across 17 studies (k = 19). The meta-analysis included 6433 predominantly White, English speaking children (Mage = 36 months; 50% female) from Western, industrialized countries. All paths in the model ...
Source
Source
#1Jing Zhao (SYSU: Sun Yat-sen University)H-Index: 8
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.