Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs and Responses to Hypothetical Prosocial, Asocial, and Antisocial Children

Published on Jul 10, 2007in Merrill-palmer Quarterly
· DOI :10.1353/MPQ.2007.0007
Kimberley A. Arbeau8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Carleton University),
Robert J. Coplan61
Estimated H-index: 61
Sources
Abstract
The goal of this study was to explore kindergarten teachers' attitudes and beliefs toward hypothetical children who frequently displayed certain types of behaviors with peers in the classroom. Participants were 202 kindergarten teachers from 4 provinces in Canada. Teachers responded to hypothetical vignettes describing children exhibiting shy, unsociable, aggressive, and prosocial behaviors. Beliefs assessed included teachers' tolerances of the behaviors, their behavioral attributions, the estimated academic and social costs to the child as a result of these behaviors, and teachers' responses to each hypothetical child. Teachers reported unique patterns of beliefs and responses toward each of the different types of children described. Not surprisingly, results indicated that teachers had the harshest beliefs toward the aggressive children. However, teachers also clearly distinguished between hypothetical children who were shy versus unsociable, whereas previous research has confounded these behaviors. Results are discussed in terms of the links between teacher beliefs/responses and child socioemotional adjustment at school.
đź“– Papers frequently viewed together
References69
Newest
#1Drew Nesdale (Griffith University)H-Index: 40
#2Kaye Pickering (Griffith University)H-Index: 1
Drawing on social schema theory (Fiske & Taylor, 1991) and social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979), this study examined the impact on teachers’ reactions to children's aggression of three variables, two of which were related to the aggressors and one was related to the teachers. Experienced female elementary school teachers (N =90) each read a scenario that described an aggressive episode committed by a group of boys against a boy from another class. The aggressors were either good or bad...
Source
#1Gunilla Bohlin (Uppsala University)H-Index: 55
#2Berit Hagekull (Uppsala University)H-Index: 31
Last. Kerstin Andersson (Uppsala University)H-Index: 55
view all 3 authors...
A sample of 81 children was followed longitudinally to assess the contributions of behavioral inhibition, early attachment security, and experience of nonparental care to individual differences in social competence. Additive, mediational, and moderator models were tried. Attachment security was assessed in the Strange Situation at 15 months of age. Behavioral inhibition at 13-15 months and 4 years, and social competence at 8 years, were captured through aggregates of ratings and observations. So...
Source
#1Kenneth H. Rubin (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 106
#2Robert J. Coplan (Carleton University)H-Index: 61
This commentary outlines the origins, history, and current status of research related to children’s social withdrawal and social isolation. Early research related to children’s peer relationships is first explored, followed by a discussion of the relative “neglect” of social withdrawal prior to the 1980s. Increased research attention since that time is briefly reviewed; this latter research has provided a greater understanding of the causes, correlates, and consequences associated with “solitude...
Source
#1Robert J. Coplan (Carleton University)H-Index: 61
#2Kavita Prakash (Carleton University)H-Index: 3
Last. Mandana Armer (Carleton University)H-Index: 4
view all 4 authors...
This study attempted to distinguish two types of social withdrawal in early childhood: (a) one based on social fear and anxiety despite a desire to interact socially (conflicted shyness) and (b) one based on the lack of a strong motivation to engage in social interaction (social disinterest). Two samples of preschoolers (n = 119 and n = 127) 3-5 years of age participated. Their mothers completed the newly developed Child Social Preference Scale, which was designed to assess conflicted shyness an...
Source
#1Peter SmithH-Index: 124
Source
#1W. Ray Crozier (Cardiff University)H-Index: 17
#2Kirsten Hostettler (Cardiff University)H-Index: 1
Background: Research has shown that shy children differ from their peers not only in their use of language in routine social encounters but also in formal assessments of their language development, including psychometric tests of vocabulary. There has been little examination of factors contributing to these individual differences. Aims: To investigate cognitive-competence and social anxiety interpretations of differences in children's performance on tests of vocabulary. To examine the performanc...
Source
#1Robert J. Coplan (Carleton University)H-Index: 61
#2Kavita Prakash (Carleton University)H-Index: 3
Abstract The goal of the present study was to explore the interface between young children’s socio-emotional characteristics and the nature of their interactions with teachers. The participants in this study were 135 preschool children (62 males and 73 females, M age =48.68 months, SD =8.30 months). Children’s interaction with teachers and play behaviors were observed during teacher-supervised free play with peers. Teachers also rated child behavior problems and social competence. Three groups o...
Source
#1Lei Chang (CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)H-Index: 58
Teachers' beliefs about aggressive and withdrawn behaviors in the classrooms and teachers' overall caring and support of students were hypothesized to influence the relations between these classroom behaviors and peer acceptance and self-perceived social competence. These hypotheses were tested in a sample of 82 middle school classes consisting of 4,650 students ages 13 to 16. The results suggest that teachers' aversion to aggression and empathy toward withdrawal enhanced the self-perceptions of...
Source
#1Heidi Gazelle (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 16
#2Gary W. Ladd (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 69
A diathesis-stress model was proposed in which the joint forces of individual vulnerability (anxious solitude) and interpersonal adversity (peer exclusion) predict depressive symptoms in children over time. Children's (N = 388; 50% female) social behavior, peer exclusion, and emotional adjustment were assessed at kindergarten entry and every spring thereafter through 4th grade, primarily by teacher report. Results indicated that anxious solitude and peer exclusion co-occur in children soon after...
Source
#1W. Ray Crozier (Cardiff University)H-Index: 17
#2Pam Perkins (Cardiff University)H-Index: 1
Differences between shy and non-shy children were found on measures of speech in an assessment situation even when variation in vocabulary scores was statistically controlled. The findings have implications for understanding shyness and for practice in assessing shy children.
Source
Cited By91
Newest
#1Talia Waltzer (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 4
#2Charles P. Baxley (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 1
Last. Audun Dahl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 17
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTYoung children’s misbehaviours can be challenging to interpret, evaluate, and intervene on. In turn, adults’ interventions on children’s transgressions inform children about how others view...
Source
#1Shanel Quenneville (Brock University)
#2Victoria Talwar (McGill University)H-Index: 26
Last. Sandra Bosacki (Brock University)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Qizhen Deng (BSU: Boise State University)H-Index: 3
#2Irina Patwardhan (Boys Town)H-Index: 5
Last. Robert J. Coplan (Carleton University)H-Index: 61
view all 7 authors...
AbstractThe present study explored the relations among preservice teacher shyness (shy, average, outgoing) and their responses towards hypothetical children displaying classroom problem behaviours ...
Source
#1Hannah Roslyne Wilkinson (Birkbeck, University of London)H-Index: 1
#2Alice Jones Bartoli (Goldsmiths, University of London)H-Index: 4
Background: Childhood antisocial behaviour has been associated with poorer teacher-student relationship (TSR) quality. It is also well-established that youth with antisocial behaviour have a range of emotion-related deficits, yet the impact of these students’ emotion-related abilities on the TSR is not understood. Furthermore, the addition of the Limited Prosocial Emotions specifier in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) indicates that understanding the role of call...
Source
#1Amanda W. Sheaffer (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 1
#2Caitlyn E. Majeika (UNT: University of North Texas)H-Index: 3
Last. Joseph H. Wehby (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 49
view all 4 authors...
As the field moves toward adaptive and individualized behavior intervention, it is important to identify and consider relevant student characteristics as potential levers (i.e., critical factors) f...
Source
#1Caroline Bouchard (Laval University)H-Index: 11
#2Audette Sylvestre (Laval University)H-Index: 7
Last. J. Trudel (Laval University)
view all 4 authors...
Resume Objectif et methode L’objectif de cet article consiste a etudier l’influence de la pragmatique du langage (usage du langage en contexte social) des filles et des garcons âges de 4 ans (n = 120) sur la prosocialite telle qu’elle est percue par leur educatrice (n = 22) en centre de la petite enfance. Resultats A l’instar de moult travaux, les resultats font ressortir une difference significative en faveur des filles plutot que des garcons, temoignant d’une perception differentielle de genre...
Source
#1Yael Nadiv (Oranim Academic College)
#2Tsameret Ricon (Oranim Academic College)H-Index: 2
Shyness is a form of social isolation and withdrawal stemming from concerns about social judgment, particularly during new situations or tests. Shy students are afraid of interacting with others, l...
Source
#1Tessa A. M. Lansu (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 15
#2Yvonne H. M. van den Berg (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 11
The moment a child walks into a new classroom, teachers and classmates form an impression based on minimal information. Yet, little is known about the accuracy of such impressions when it concerns ...
Source
#1Taigan L. MacGowan (McMaster University)H-Index: 3
#2Louis A. Schmidt (McMaster University)H-Index: 65
: Maternal psychological factors are known to play a critical role in children's socioemotional development, particularly in pro- and anti-social behaviors. Although shyness is a ubiquitous phenomenon and associated with social anxiety, relatively few have examined the relation between maternal shyness and children's socioemotional development. We explored the moderating influence of children's resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change on the relation between maternal shyness and...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.