Stereotypic Beliefs About Masculine Honor Are Associated With Perceptions of Rape and Women Who Have Been Raped

Published on Jun 15, 2015in Social Psychology2.473
· DOI :10.1027/1864-9335/A000240
Donald A. Saucier21
Estimated H-index: 21
(KSU: Kansas State University),
Megan L. Strain8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UNK: University of Nebraska at Kearney)
+ 1 AuthorsJessica L. McManus5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Carroll College)
Source
Abstract
Abstract. Masculine honor consists of stereotypic beliefs about male behavior, including the belief that men’s aggression is appropriate, justifiable, and necessary in response to provocation, especially provocation that insults or threatens one’s manhood, family, or romantic partner. We conducted two studies examining the relationships between stereotypic masculine honor beliefs and perceptions of rape. Masculine honor beliefs generally were associated with both negative attitudes toward rape and negative attitudes toward women who have been raped. Further, different components of masculine honor beliefs correlated differently with various rape perceptions. These outcomes illustrate the complexity of the stereotypic beliefs about appropriate male behavior that comprise masculine honor, and which emphasize men’s responsibility to both take care of others and demonstrate interpersonal dominance.
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References75
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#2Jericho M. Hockett (WU: Washburn University)H-Index: 9
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We developed measures assessing personal and normative attitudes toward two types of behaviors that are symptomatic of rape culture. We conceptualize sexual violence as existing on a continuum and argue that two types of behaviors may be potential antecedents to (and consequences of) sexual violence: attempts to pressure, which mimic the power dynamics of rape in a less aggressive fashion, and benevolent dating behaviors, which are accepted dating scripts in which men initiate action. We examine...
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The experience of masculinity includes many expectations for what it means to be a man. Research has demonstrated that men raised in the American South incorporate into their identities the beliefs that provocation requires an aggressive response so that they may solidify their masculinity and reduce their future vulnerability to transgressions. We contend that while there are cultural differences in the extent to which men embrace honor as key to their masculinity, there is variability among me...
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Abstract The acceptance of rape myths persists at varying levels across societies, which creates a hostile environment in which rape is justified and victims are blamed for being assaulted. This study investigated experience and familiarity with sexual assault, the Dark Triad traits, and gender-based beliefs benevolent and hostile sexism, and masculine honor beliefs as predictors of rape myth acceptance in a Lebanese sample consisting of 311 participants (177 women). Men scored significantly hig...
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Abstract Masculine honor ideology refers to beliefs dictating men should defend against threats, often through violent responses. Research has shown masculine honor beliefs are associated with more positive perceptions of men who defend against threat and less positive perceptions of men who do not defend against threat. Across four studies, we extended these findings by examining whether, as a function of masculine honor beliefs, men are perceived more positively simply for being violent, or if...
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