We Eat First with Our (Digital) Eyes: Enhancing Mental Simulation of Eating Experiences via Visual-Enabling Technologies

Published on Apr 28, 2021in Journal of Retailing5.245
· DOI :10.1016/J.JRETAI.2021.04.003
Olivia Petit12
Estimated H-index: 12
(KEDGE Business School),
Ana Javornik8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Carlos Velasco42
Estimated H-index: 42
(BI Norwegian Business School)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract This research examines how consumers’ intentions to purchase food change depending on the visualisation mode (3D vs. AR) and product format (served vs. packaged). In three studies, we demonstrate that mental simulation of eating experiences (process and outcome) mediate these effects. Study 1 shows that AR visualisation of a served food improves simulation of the eating process over 3D visualisation, with a positive effect on purchase intention. Study 2 reveals that 3D visualisation improves purchase intention for packaged products (high instrumental properties) over served products (low instrumental properties) while the opposite is true for AR visualisation. In addition, interactivity and immersion mediate the effects of 3D (vs. AR) on mental simulation of the eating process for packaged products. Study 3 extends these results by showing that 3D increases purchase intention by eliciting mental simulation of the eating outcome, when the food is visible due to transparent (vs. opaque) packaging (displaying both sensory and instrumental properties), but that no such differences emerge for AR. This research highlights the importance of using different visualisation modes to promote food depending on the product format. The findings have important implications for both offline and online retailers.
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
References66
Newest
#1Naveen Donthu (GSU: Georgia State University)H-Index: 55
#2Anders Gustafsson (BI Norwegian Business School)H-Index: 56
The COVID-19 outbreak is a sharp reminder that pandemics, like other rarely occurring catastrophes, have happened in the past and will continue to happen in the future Even if we cannot prevent dangerous viruses from emerging, we should prepare to dampen their effects on society The current outbreak has had severe economic consequences across the globe, and it does not look like any country will be unaffected This not only has consequences for the economy;all of society is affected, which has le...
Source
#1Wayne D. Hoyer (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 57
#2Mirja Kroschke (WWU: University of Münster)H-Index: 3
Last. Venkatesh Shankar (A&M: Texas A&M University)H-Index: 57
view all 5 authors...
Abstract New technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), Mixed Reality (MR), virtual assistants, chatbots, and robots, which are typically powered by Artificial Intelligence (AI), are dramatically transforming the customer experience. In this paper, we offer a fresh typology of new technologies powered by AI and propose a new framework for understanding the role of new technologies on the customer/shopper journey. Specifically, we discuss the impa...
Source
#1Naomí C. Muñoz-Vilches (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 2
#2Hans C. M. van Trijp (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 7
Last. Betina Piqueras-Fiszman (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 34
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Many people struggle with the classical choice of eating a mouth-watering snack versus a healthier product. One of the reasons behind this is that unhealthier products are appealing for their direct gratification; they deliver pleasure. The present research investigates the effect of mental simulation as a relatively new strategy to possibly shift the balance between direct gratification and the consideration of longer-term benefits necessary to make healthier choices. Specifically we d...
Source
#1Giovanni Pino (University of Chieti-Pescara)H-Index: 12
#2Cesare Amatulli (University of Bari)H-Index: 14
Last. Gianluigi Guido (University of Salento)H-Index: 24
view all 6 authors...
Abstract This research examines how touching (versus not touching) tactile-functional products—namely those that provide a tactile feedback related to their utilitarian characteristics—affects these products’ expected ease of use, as well as consumers’ attitudes and intentions toward them. Three experimental studies investigated these effects by focusing on consumer electronics. Study 1 shows that product touch positively affects consumer attitude toward tactile-functional products via an increa...
Source
#1Dipayan Biswas (USF: University of South Florida)H-Index: 18
Abstract Sensory elements are an important aspect of both offline and online retail stores and can non-consciously influence consumer judgments and purchase behavior. In offline settings, ambient factors like scent, lighting, and music have been shown to influence customers’ shopping experiences and their buying behaviors. For online retail outlets, sensory factors related to color, display patterns, and layouts can have significant effects on consumer behavior. Sensory elements have strong mana...
Source
#1Kirsten Cowan (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 10
#2Seth Ketron (CPP: California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)H-Index: 8
Virtual reality (VR) is of increasing interest to marketers because it can be used to explore and proactively shape long-term futures, co-create value with consumers, and foster consumer-brand engagement. Yet, to date, the field lacks a cohesive framework for approaching VR research; thus, the objective of this systematic literature review is to provide such a framework and highlight research opportunities.,First, after conducting a systematic literature review, we highlight VR themes instrument...
Source
#1Sarah HudsonH-Index: 17
Last. Guillaume JégouH-Index: 1
view all 4 authors...
Abstract This collaborative research between a team of digital technology developers and academic researchers investigates how social interaction affects visitors' experience during a virtual reality (VR) underwater seascape exploration. Prior research in immersive VR focused more on individual perceptions of immersion, interactive features and enjoyment. Analysis of focus-group discussions revealed three categories of immersion, interaction with the virtual environment (VE) and social interacti...
Source
#2Reto Felix (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 12
Last. Chris Hinsch (GV: Grand Valley State University)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Augmented Reality (AR) is a promising and growing field in marketing research and practice. Very little is known if, how, and why AR-apps can impact consumers’ perception and evaluation of brands. The following research presents and empirically tests a framework that theorizes how consumers perceive and evaluate the benefits and augmentation quality of AR apps, and how this evaluation drives subsequent changes in brand attitude. The study reveals consumer inspiration as a mediating cons...
Source
#1Carlos Flavián (University of Zaragoza)H-Index: 49
#2Sergio Ibáñez-Sánchez (University of Zaragoza)H-Index: 9
Last. Carlos Orús (University of Zaragoza)H-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The arrival of Virtual-Reality, Augmented-Reality, and Mixed-Reality technologies is shaping a new environment where physical and virtual objects are integrated at different levels. Due to the development of portable and embodied devices, together with highly interactive, physical-virtual connections, the customer experience landscape is evolving into new types of hybrid experiences. However, the boundaries between these new realities, technologies and experiences have not yet been clea...
Source
#1Jonas Heller (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 10
#2Mathew Chylinski (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 13
Last. Debbie Isobel Keeling (University of Sussex)H-Index: 20
view all 5 authors...
Abstract The rapid development of augmented reality (AR) is reshaping retail frontline operations by enhancing the offline and online customer experience. Drawing on mental imagery theory, this paper develops a conceptual framework to reflect how AR emulates customer’s cognitive processes offloading those to the technology. Consequently, the AR-enabled frontline improves decision comfort, motivates positive WOM and facilitates choice of higher value products. The underlying mechanism is a sequen...
Source
Cited By6
Newest
Abstract null null Luxury brands’ pioneering digital strategies now incorporate augmented reality (AR), which offers new opportunities thanks to AR unique characteristics. Luxury brands differ from other brands in their specific attributes, such as authenticity, exclusivity, hedonism, and aesthetic expression. This research investigates how AR characteristics can support luxury brands by drawing on illustrative cases of AR deployment by luxury brands and in-depth interviews with executives and s...
Source
#1Tim Hilken (UM: Maastricht University)H-Index: 9
#2Mathew Chylinski (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 13
Last. Dominik Mahr (UM: Maastricht University)H-Index: 20
view all 6 authors...
Despite the promise of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) to help experiential retailers align online and offline experiences, guidance on choosing or combining these technologies is lacking. In three experiments, we address this research gap by investigating the individual and combined impact of AR and VR on key marketing objectives. First, we establish that AR is more effective in stimulating purchase intentions than VR, due to its ability to support customers in fluent product-fo...
Source
#1Kirsten Cowan (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 10
#2Ana Javornik (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 8
Last. Peilin Jiang (Edin.: University of Edinburgh)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Carlos VelascoH-Index: 42
#2Tsutomu SunagaH-Index: 3
Last. Olivia PetitH-Index: 12
view all 6 authors...
Source
Source
#1Jochen Hartmann (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 3
#2Mark Heitmann (UHH: University of Hamburg)H-Index: 16
Last. Oded Netzer (Columbia University)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
Smartphones have made sharing images of branded experiences on social media nearly effortless. Tracking and understanding how brands appear online is relevant to brands both as an indicator of social media brand interest, and to incentivize consumers to create and share certain brand images. This research investigates consumer-generated brand images. Aside from packshots (i.e., standalone product images), the authors identify two different types of brand-related selfie images: consumer selfies, ...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.