The effects of belief in pure good and belief in pure evil on consumer ethics

Published on Jul 1, 2021in Personality and Individual Differences3.004
· DOI :10.1016/J.PAID.2021.110768
Russell J. Webster10
Estimated H-index: 10
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Nicolette (Lynn) Morrone1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Donald A. Saucier21
Estimated H-index: 21
(KSU: Kansas State University)
Source
Abstract
Abstract Even if businesses try to be ethical, they can succeed only if there are ethically-minded consumers. Three studies using college (N = 199) and nationwide (Ns = 345 and 327) convenience samples examined the effects of belief in pure evil (BPE) and belief in pure good (BPG) on consumer ethics attitudes and behavior, after controlling for demographic variables and various moral attitude scales. Across S1 and S2, BPG uniquely predicted greater endorsement of more prosocial consumer actions (e.g., eco-friendly/green behaviors) and greater admonition of more questionable, passive, and active forms of consumer misconduct. BPE, surprisingly, did not consistently predict (or even consistently correlate bivariately with) consumer ethics attitudes. However, in S3, BPE uniquely predicted greater likeability/intentions to buy a product with a poor (vs. excellent) environmental rating regardless of price; meanwhile, BPG uniquely predicted lower likeability/intentions to buy the environmentally unfriendly product and greater likeability/intentions to buy the environmentally friendly product. Parallel findings were found for intentions to watch YouTube videos that explained how to do ethical (vs. unethical) consumer behaviors. In sum, BPG—but not BPE—appears to most consistently relate to both perceptions of ethical consumer behavior and behavioral intentions to act ethically in the marketplace.
References50
Newest
#1Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
#2Dominic Vasturia (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
Source
This paper applies moral foundations theory in the context of consumer ethics. The purpose of the study is to examine whether moral foundations theory can be utilised as a theoretical framework to explain consumers’ beliefs regarding both ethical and unethical consumption. The relationships among various moral foundations and different dimensions of consumer ethics are examined with a sample of 450 US consumers. The results demonstrate that, among the various moral foundations, only the sanctity...
Source
#1Evmorfia Karampournioti (Leibniz University of Hanover)H-Index: 4
#2Nadine Hennigs (Leibniz University of Hanover)H-Index: 23
Last. Klaus-Peter Wiedmann (Leibniz University of Hanover)H-Index: 29
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Kelly Goldsmith (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 12
#2Caroline Roux (Concordia University)H-Index: 5
Last. Jingjing Ma (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 6
view all 3 authors...
Consumers often adopt a goal to choose “the best” option: be it the best value for their money, the product with the highest quality, or the product that offers the best match to their idiosyncratic preferences. Prior work has characterized this orientation as a “maximizing mindset,” and has demonstrated that the adoption of a maximizing mindset can lead to both positive and negative consequences for the self. However, to date, little is known about if a maximizing mindset might have consequence...
Source
#1Margaret C. Campbell (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 19
#2Karen Page Winterich (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 23
Source
#1Shannon Currie (RyeU: Ryerson University)H-Index: 2
#2Becky L. Choma (RyeU: Ryerson University)H-Index: 21
ABSTRACTCombating climate change and protecting the environment is a significant topic amongst political leaders and concerned citizens across the globe. The degree to which individuals perceive green issues as important is connected to their politics, those subscribing to conservative ideologies being less supportive of pro-environmental initiatives and less concerned about climate change than those endsorsing liberal ideologies. Examining political ideology as a uni- and bi-dimensional constru...
Source
#1Dominic Vasturia (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
#2Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Mass shootings have received widespread media attention due to their extreme violence. People who report greater belief in pure evil (BPE; the tendency to attribute harmdoing to dispositionally sadistic individuals) generally favor harsher criminal punishment, regardless of whether criminals exhibit stereotypically “evil” traits. We examined whether BPE predicted evaluations of gun violence perpetrators despite different situational factors related to the shooter's and crime's circumsta...
Source
#1Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
#2Russell J. WebsterH-Index: 10
Last. Megan L. Strain (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)H-Index: 8
view all 6 authors...
Source
Research on the antecedents of consumers’ ethical beliefs has mainly examined cognitive variables and has (with a few exceptions) neglected the relationships among affective variables and consumer ethics. However, research in moral psychology indicates that moral emotions have a significant role in ethical decision-making (Haidt, Handbook of affective sciences, 2003). Thus, the ability to experience, perceive and regulate emotions should influence consumers’ ethical decision-making. These abilit...
Source
#2Donald A. Saucier (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 1
Abstract We examined the effects of belief in pure evil (BPE) and belief in pure good (BPG) on perceptions and evaluations of a stereotypically altruistic (vs. egoistic) hero who apprehended a criminal perpetrator. Overall, participants appreciably supported formal, public accolades for the altruistic hero because they more greatly deified (i.e., venerated) the altruistic hero. Greater levels of BPG were associated with greater deification only of the altruistic hero, and levels of BPG did not p...
Source
Cited By1
Newest
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.