First-time mothers’ birth beliefs, preferences, and actual birth: A longitudinal observational study

Published on Feb 1, 2019in Women and Birth3.172
· DOI :10.1016/J.WOMBI.2018.04.019
Heidi Preis10
Estimated H-index: 10
(TAU: Tel Aviv University),
Michal Eisner4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Rabin Medical Center)
+ 1 AuthorsYael Benyamini39
Estimated H-index: 39
(TAU: Tel Aviv University)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract Problem Birth preferences, such as mode and place of birth and other birth options, have important individual and societal implications, yet few studies have investigated the mechanism which predicts a wide range of childbirth options simultaneously. Background Basic beliefs about birth as a natural and as a medical process are both predictive factors for childbirth preferences. Studies investigating birth beliefs, preferences, and actual birth are rare. Aim To test a predictive model of how these beliefs translate into birth preferences and into actual birth related-options. Methods Longitudinal observational study including 342 first-time expectant mothers recruited at women’s health centres and natural birth communities in Israel. All women filled out questionnaires including basic birth beliefs and preferred birth options. Two months postpartum, they filled out a questionnaire including detailed questions regarding actual birth. Findings Stronger beliefs about birth being natural were related to preferring a more natural place and mode of birth and preferring more natural birth-related options. Stronger beliefs about birth being medical were associated with opposite options. The preferences mediated the association between the birth beliefs and actual birth. The beliefs predicted the preferences better than they predicted actual birth. Discussion Birth beliefs are pivotal in the decision-making process regarding preferred and actual birth options. In a medicalized obstetric system, where natural birth is something women need to actively seek out and insist on, the predictive powers of beliefs and of preferences decrease. Conclusion Women’s beliefs should be recognized and birth preferences respected.
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References32
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#1Heidi Preis (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 10
#2Miri GozlanH-Index: 7
Last. Yael Benyamini (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 39
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Abstract Objective Perceptions about the nature of the birth process are important in determining women's birth choices regarding labour and delivery but are scarcely the subject of empirical research. The aim of the current study was to assess women's beliefs about birth as a natural and safe or medical and risky process and study the associations of these beliefs with fear of childbirth and planned birth choices. Design An observational study using self-administered questionnaires during pregn...
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#1Heidi Preis (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 10
#2Rony Chen (Rabin Medical Center)H-Index: 19
Last. Yael Benyamini (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 39
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Background Women perceive what birth is even before they are pregnant for the first time. Part of this conceptualization is the basic belief about birth as a medical and natural process. These two separate beliefs are pivotal in the decision-making process about labor and birth. Adapting Engel's biopsychosocial framework, we explored the importance of a wide range of factors which may contribute to these beliefs among first-time mothers. Method This observational study included 413 primiparae ≥2...
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#1Yael Benyamini (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 39
#2Maya Molcho (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 2
Last. Heidi Preis (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 10
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Abstract Problem Rates of medical interventions in childbirth have greatly increased in the Western world. Background Women’s attitudes affect their birth choices. Aim To assess women’s attitudes towards the medicalization of childbirth and their associations with women’s background as well as their fear of birth and planned and unplanned modes of birth. Methods This longitudinal observational study included 836 parous woman recruited at women’s health centres and natural birth communities in Is...
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#1Heidi Preis (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 10
#2Yael Benyamini (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 39
AbstractIntroduction: Basic beliefs about birth as a natural and safe or a medical and risky process are central in the decisions on where and how to birth. Despite their importance, they have not been studied separately from other childbirth-related constructs. Our aim was to develop a measure to assess these beliefs.Method: Pregnant Israeli women (N = 850, gestational week ≥14) were recruited in women’s health centers, in online natural birth forums, and through home midwives. Participants fil...
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#1Yvonne Hauck (Curtin University)H-Index: 31
#2Kathrin Stoll (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
Last. Jill Downie (Curtin University)H-Index: 14
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Abstract Background The reality of childbirth fear is recognised for expectant parents but we lack knowledge about the childbirth attitudes of the next generation of Australian parents. Aim Examination of adults’ attitudes toward childbirth including influencing contributing factors, fear scores, birth preferences and reasons for this preference. Methods A cross-sectional online study was conducted with 654 Western Australian students attending one tertiary institution. Students (male and female...
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#1Fatemeh DarsarehH-Index: 2
#2Teamur AghamolaeiH-Index: 17
Last. Shahram ZareH-Index: 13
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Abstract Background Although vaginal birth is the safest type of childbirth, sometimes caesarean is necessary for the safety of the mother or the infant. The problem is that low-risk, healthy women are choosing caesarean as a birth option despite the fact that it is fraught with possible complications. Aim To determine the differences and identify the predictors for the way women plan their childbirth based on Health Belief Model. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Bandar abbas cit...
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#1Rebecca J. Wood (University College of the North)H-Index: 13
#2Javier Mignone (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 14
Last. Kerstin Roger (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 13
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Abstract Objective the primary objective for this study was to explore women's experiences of choosing to plan a birth at an out-of-hospital birth centre. We sought to understand how women make the choice to plan for an out-of-hospital birth and the meaning that women ascribe to this decision-making process. Design, setting, and participants a qualitative phenomenological study was conducted in Winnipeg, Canada with a sample of seventeen post partum women who represent the socio-demographic char...
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#2Arni ZacksH-Index: 1
Last. Sigal LevyH-Index: 9
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Abstract Objective to study home, natural hospital, and medical hospital births, and the association of these birth models to resilience and birth experience. Design cross-section retrospective design. Setting participants were recruited via an online survey system. Invitations to participate were posted in five different Internet forums for women on maternity leave, from September 2014 to August 2015. Participants the sample comprised 381 post partum healthy women above the age of 20, during th...
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#1Kathrin Stoll (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 22
#2Yvonne Hauck (Curtin University)H-Index: 31
Last. Wendy Hall (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 64
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Abstract Background Australian caesarean birth rates have exceeded 30% in most states and are approaching 45%, on average, in private hospitals. Australian midwifery practice occurs almost exclusively in hospitals; less than 3% of women deliver at home or in birthing centres. It is unclear whether the trend towards hospital-based, high interventionist birth reflects preferences of the next generation of maternity care consumers. Aim and methods We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional online s...
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Introduction The birth center, a relatively recent innovation in maternity care, is an increasingly popular location of birth. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to assess the research on maternal outcomes from birth center care. Methods Using methods by Whittemore and Knafl, we conducted an integrative review of studies of birth centers published in English since 1980. Twenty-three quantitative sources and 9 qualitative sources describing maternal outcomes of birth center care...
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#1Nora K. Schaal (HHU: University of Düsseldorf)H-Index: 10
#2Carsten Hagenbeck (HHU: University of Düsseldorf)H-Index: 10
Last. Philip Hepp (Augsburg College)H-Index: 11
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PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to compare birth expectations and antenatal bonding of women pregnant prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 74 pregnant women (mean age: 33.9 ± 4.1 years, gestational age: 36 ± 2 weeks) participated in the study, who were pregnant either during the the COVID-19 pandemic (corona group, N = 35, April-July 2020) or before the pandemic (control group, N = 39, October 2017-January 2019). Birth expectations were measured u...
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#1Heidi Preis (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 10
#2Brittain Mahaffey (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 14
Last. Marci Lobel (SBU: Stony Brook University)H-Index: 42
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BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic introduced unparalleled uncertainty into the lives of pregnant women, including concerns about where it is the safest to give birth, while preserving their rights and wishes. Reports on the increased interest in community births (at home or in birth centers) are emerging. The purpose of this project was to quantitatively investigate psychological factors related to this birth preference. METHODS: This study included 3896 pregnant women from the COVID-19 Pregnanc...
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#1Agneta Westergren (Umeå University)H-Index: 1
#2Kerstin Edin (Umeå University)H-Index: 18
Last. Monica Christianson (Umeå University)H-Index: 10
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Abstract Background Sweden, along with other countries, is facing rising intrapartum intervention rates. Aim To explore the medicalisation of childbirth through women’s preferences for and use of pain relief, and to investigate whether the presence of a birth plan had any impact on use of pain relief, rate of intervention, and satisfaction with the birth experience. Methods The study was cross-sectional, and included 129 women with birth plans and 110 without, all of whom gave birth in one hospi...
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#1Rotem Kahalon (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 6
#2Gil Yanushevsky Cnaani (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 1
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The present study assessed the effects of several prenatal maternal expectations on postpartum depression (PPD), while considering two relevant factors – incongruence between planned and actual bir...
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The impact of birth beliefs on pregnancy and delivery are universally recognized, but the factors that affect birth beliefs vary across regions depending on individual and cultural characteristics. This study aimed to determine women's birth beliefs and examine their associated factors.,This cross-sectional study was conducted with 548 primiparas in the obstetrics clinic of a university hospital located in the Southeastern Anatolian Region of Turkey from February to June 2019. Descriptive charac...
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