Exploring creative mindsets: Variable and person-centered approaches.

Published on Feb 1, 2019in Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts4.349
· DOI :10.1037/ACA0000170
Maciej Karwowski35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UWr: University of Wrocław),
Ryan Royston3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UNO: University of Nebraska Omaha),
Roni Reiter-Palmon37
Estimated H-index: 37
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Abstract
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References51
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#1Rogelio Puente-Díaz (Universidad Anáhuac México Norte)H-Index: 11
#2Judith Cavazos-Arroyo (UPAEP: Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla)H-Index: 9
Abstract In two studies, we examined the influence of a growth and a fixed creative mindset on task-approach, other-approach and other-avoidance achievement goals, creative self-efficacy, enjoyment, and perceived performance and effort exerted among college business students from Mexico. We conducted both studies in a business educational setting where the development of creative skills is highly valued. Results from study 1 showed a positive influence of a growth creative mindset on task-approa...
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#1Alexander S. McKay (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 5
#2Maciej KarwowskiH-Index: 35
Last. James C. Kaufman (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 101
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#1Ronald A. Beghetto (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 35
#2Maciej KarwowskiH-Index: 35
In this chapter, we argue that the way researchers (including ourselves) have conceptualized and measured creative self-beliefs may blur important distinctions among these beliefs. We focus our discussion on three key self-beliefs: creative self-efficacy, creative metacognition, and creative self-concept. More specifically, we aim to clarify how these beliefs are conceptually distinct, highlight key areas of conceptual overlap, and offer our recommendations on how researchers might revise or dev...
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We posit that self-beliefs have important implications for creativity and innovation. Specifically, we provide conceptual definitions for creative self-efficacy, creative identity, creative mindsets, and creative metacognition and explain why these self-beliefs play an important role in the creativity and innovation process. In addition, we discuss the empirical literature supporting our argument that self-beliefs are relevant for researchers and practitioners wanting to: (1) understand the crea...
#1Richard W. Hass (Philadelphia University)H-Index: 13
#2Roni Reiter-Palmon (UNO: University of Nebraska Omaha)H-Index: 37
Last. Jen Katz-Buonincontro (Drexel University)H-Index: 9
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Abstract Implicit theories of creativity have become a focus of research for a number of important reasons. In this chapter we outline evidence that implicit theories are the product of social learning, and, as such are not likely to be totally domain general. We first discuss a small taxonomy of implicit theories including self-theories, and mindsets. Then we present evidence that implicit theories are not constant across domain boundaries. Finally, we discuss implications of this theoretical v...
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#1Jean E. Pretz (Elizabethtown College)H-Index: 18
#2Danielle Nelson (Elizabethtown College)H-Index: 1
Abstract In this chapter, we examined the relationship between self-perceived creativity, creative performance, and other measures of the self. Past work has shown that global creative self-efficacy was more strongly related to personality or past creative accomplishments than current performance on creative tasks [Pretz, J. E., & McCollum, V. A. (2014). Self-perceptions of creativity do not always reflect actual creative performance. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 8, 227–23...
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#1Maciej KarwowskiH-Index: 35
#2Arkadiusz BrzeskiH-Index: 3
Abstract Believing that creativity is stable (fixed) versus possible to change (malleable) can have severe consequences for people’s creative self-beliefs and motivation, all the way to their creative activity and, subsequently, creative achievement. These creative mindsets may be perceived as a subset of implicit theories of creativity that specifically relates to perceived sources of creative potential. Intriguingly, recent research demonstrated that in the case of creativity, people hold both...
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#1Marta KwaśnikH-Index: 1
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#1Richard W. Hass (Philadelphia University)H-Index: 13
#2Jen Katz-Buonincontro (Drexel University)H-Index: 9
Last. Roni Reiter-Palmon (UNO: University of Nebraska Omaha)H-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
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Cited By10
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#2Sandra MoffettH-Index: 15
Last. Martin McCrackenH-Index: 16
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Originality: This is the first piece of work that has investigated the fit between TM/HRD and creativity research. Our conceptual model illustrates that creativity can be promoted and developed at work by incorporating developmental initiatives such as TM/HRD.
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#1Zhitian Skylor Zhang (FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)H-Index: 2
#2Linda HoxhaH-Index: 1
Last. Albert Ziegler (FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)H-Index: 26
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#1Jen Katz-Buonincontro (Drexel University)H-Index: 9
#2Richard W. Hass (Thomas Jefferson University)H-Index: 13
Last. Weiping Hu (SNNU: Shaanxi Normal University)H-Index: 15
view all 5 authors...
BACKGROUND While empirical research on creativity has grown steadily over the past 35 years, teachers' beliefs about creativity and their implicit beliefs about teaching for creativity remains understudied, as well as cross-cultural examination of teacher beliefs in this area. AIMS This study explored the measurement invariance of beliefs about teaching for creativity (creative self-efficacy, fixed creative mindset, growth creative mindset, desirability of creativity for teaching success and val...
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#1Rogelio Puente-Díaz (Universidad Anáhuac México Norte)H-Index: 11
#2Judith Cavazos-Arroyo (UPAEP: Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla)H-Index: 9
Last. Lizbeth Puerta-Sierra (Universidad Anáhuac México Norte)H-Index: 2
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#1Jen Katz-Buonincontro (Drexel University)H-Index: 9
#2Richard W. Hass (Thomas Jefferson University)H-Index: 13
Last. Elaine Perignat (Drexel University)H-Index: 3
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#1Elaine Perignat (Drexel University)H-Index: 3
#2Alysha Meloche (Drexel University)H-Index: 2
In an effort to address the needs of twenty-first century businesses, academic institutions are developing courses on creativity and innovation. Students’ capacity for learning such strategies are ...
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#2Richard W. HassH-Index: 13
Last. Elaine PerignatH-Index: 3
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#1Yiyong Zhou (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 1
#2Wa Yang (RUC: Renmin University of China)H-Index: 1
Last. Xinwen Bai (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 8
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Creative mindsets reflect the implicit beliefs individuals hold regarding the nature of creativity as innate (i.e., fixed mindset) or malleable (i.e., growth mindset). Karwowski (2014) developed the Creative Mindsets Scale (CMS) in which fixed or growth creative mindset was each measured with 5 items. Across three studies, the current study aimed to examine its psychometric properties in Chinese settings, and to explore to what extent effects of creative mindsets on creativity were generalized t...
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#1Aleksandra Zielińska (UWr: University of Wrocław)H-Index: 2
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#1Maciej KarwowskiH-Index: 35
#2Izabela LebudaH-Index: 16
Last. Ronald A. BeghettoH-Index: 35
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