Qualitative insights into how men with low-risk prostate cancer choosing active surveillance negotiate stress and uncertainty

Published on May 8, 2017in BMC Urology1.592
· DOI :10.1186/S12894-017-0225-3
Emily M Mader10
Estimated H-index: 10
(State University of New York Upstate Medical University),
Hsin H. Li2
Estimated H-index: 2
(State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
+ 9 AuthorsTelisa Stewart6
Estimated H-index: 6
(State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract Background Active surveillance is a management strategy for men diagnosed with early-stage, low-risk prostate cancer in which their cancer is monitored and treatment is delayed. This study investigated the primary coping mechanisms for men following the active surveillance treatment plan, with a specific focus on how these men interact with their social network as they negotiate the stress and uncertainty of their diagnosis and treatment approach. Methods Thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews at two academic institutions located in the northeastern US. Participants include 15 men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer following active surveillance. Results The decision to follow active surveillance reflects the desire to avoid potentially life-altering side effects associated with active treatment options. Men on active surveillance cope with their prostate cancer diagnosis by both maintaining a sense of control over their daily lives, as well as relying on the support provided them by their social networks and the medical community. Social networks support men on active surveillance by encouraging lifestyle changes and serving as a resource to discuss and ease cancer-related stress. Conclusions Support systems for men with low-risk prostate cancer do not always interface directly with the medical community. Spousal and social support play important roles in helping men understand and accept their prostate cancer diagnosis and chosen care plan. It may be beneficial to highlight the role of social support in interventions targeting the psychosocial health of men on active surveillance.
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