Exploring creative learning in the classroom: A multi-method approach

Published on Jun 1, 2017in Thinking Skills and Creativity3.106
· DOI :10.1016/J.TSC.2017.04.002
Aleksandra Gajda9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Ronald A. Beghetto35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UConn: University of Connecticut),
Maciej Karwowski35
Estimated H-index: 35
Sources
Abstract
Abstract How might researchers better understand the variations in creative learning in and across classrooms? This article addresses this question. We introduce a multi-method approach that we used to explore the more dynamic features of creative learning in ten elementary classrooms. The ten classrooms were first classified into one of three groups (positive, negative, and null), based on the relationship between students’ ( N  = 204) measured creativity and academic achievement (average positive r  = 0.52; average negative r  = −0.23; and average null r =  0.02). Next, we analyzed observed teacher and student behaviors in each classroom. We found different patterns of behavior based on classroom classifications. Teachers in classrooms with a positive association between creativity and academic achievement tended to demonstrate more caring behaviors toward students and to provide more emotional support to students. We also found that teacher behaviors associated with encouraging creativity in the classroom were associated with students’ positive engagement, self-expression, and ideation (regardless of classroom type). Finally, we used a micro-level interactional analysis to visually illustrate patterns of interactions between teachers and students in three different classroom classifications. We found more extended and exploratory interactions in the positive association classroom, whereas the negative association classroom was characterized by more directive and rapidly closing patterns of interaction and the null association classroom tended to have patterns of interaction that left students’ ideas suspended and lacked exploration, development or refinement of ideas. We close by discussing how the use of blended methodologies, like the one demonstrated in this article, can be further refined and developed in subsequent research to explore and understand the more dynamic features of creative thought and action in classroom settings.
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
References53
Newest
#1Aleksandra GajdaH-Index: 9
#2Maciej KarwowskiH-Index: 35
Last. Ronald A. Beghetto (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 35
view all 3 authors...
This article reports on a meta-analysis of 120 studies (total N = 52,578; 782 effects) examining the relationship between creativity and academic achievement in research conducted since the 1960s. Average correlation between creativity and academic achievement was r = .22, 95% CI [.19, .24]. An analysis of moderators revealed that this relationship was constant across time but stronger when creativity was measured using creativity tests compared to self-report measures and when academic achievem...
Source
Schools have poor reputation among creativity researchers. Teachers’ biases and implicit theories, disruptive behaviors among creative students, and the equivocal pattern of the relationship between creativity and school achievement all contribute to this fact. This chapter presents a new typological model of creativity and demonstrate how this model and its categories may be useful in understanding different, often contradictory, findings present in the creative education literature.
Source
#1John Baer (Rider University)H-Index: 47
Creativity brings joy, wonder, efficiency, excitement, and pleasure into our lives. Although creativity can also be malevolent (see, e.g., Cropley et al., Creat Res J 20(2):105–115, 2008), for the most part creativity makes life better, and most of us would like to have and to experience more of it. Nurturing creativity is therefore something that many of us would like to do. We’d like to help our students, our colleagues, our employees (or employers), and of course ourselves be more creative.
Source
#1Ronald A. Beghetto (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 35
Source
#1Maciej KarwowskiH-Index: 35
Last. James C. KaufmanH-Index: 101
view all 2 authors...
Source
#1Edward P. Clapp (Harvard University)H-Index: 5
Abstract This article examines the relationship between creative abilities and school achievement as measured by using both standardized achievement tests and GPA in Polish primary, middle and high school students. A total of 1106 students were examined (242 lower primary school, 155 upper primary school, 448 middle school and 261 high school students). Multilevel regression models demonstrated the positive, yet weak relationship between school achievement and creativity. There was also evidence...
Source
Source
#1Ronald A. BeghettoH-Index: 35
Source
#1Lene TanggaardH-Index: 1
#2Ronald A. Beghetto (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 35
Source
Cited By49
Newest
#1Stacie Dear Austin (ULM: University of Louisiana at Monroe)H-Index: 1
Source
#2Richmond Anane-simon (Pentecost University College)H-Index: 1
Source
#1Yi Zhang (CCNU: Central China Normal University)H-Index: 1
#2Zhongling Pi (SNNU: Shaanxi Normal University)H-Index: 9
Last. Jiumin Yang (CCNU: Central China Normal University)H-Index: 6
view all 5 authors...
Abstract null null Creativity is considered to be a vital 21st-century skill, and is therefore a critical component of any education program. There is growing evidence to suggest that peers’ ideas (e.g., feedback, creative works) can stimulate learners’ creativity in contexts of interaction. Thus, to compensate for the limitations of immediate feedback in online learning spaces, the current study used an online platform to facilitate undergraduate students in peer assessments. Sixty-nine undergr...
Source
#1Yumiko Murai (SFU: Simon Fraser University)H-Index: 2
#2Ryohei Ikejiri (UTokyo: University of Tokyo)H-Index: 4
Last. Seiko Nakano (Google)
view all 5 authors...
Cultivating children’s creativity and imagination is fundamental to preparing them for an increasingly complex and uncertain future. Engaging in creative learning enables children to think independ...
Source
#1Jaggil Apak (UMS: Universiti Malaysia Sabah)H-Index: 1
#2Muhamad Suhaimi Taat (UMS: Universiti Malaysia Sabah)H-Index: 2
Last. Norazah Mohd Suki (UUM: Universiti Utara Malaysia)H-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
The COVID-19 pandemic is drastically reshaping the 21st century classroom management to remote learning via various online teaching and learning platforms across the world The aims of this study are threefold: to assess the level of creativity nurturing behavior and teacher readiness for 21st century classroom management, to test the differences of this relationships towards teaching experience, and to examine the relationship between teachers' creativity nurturing behavior and their readiness f...
Source
#1Zhitian Skylor Zhang (FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)H-Index: 2
#2Linda HoxhaH-Index: 1
Last. Albert Ziegler (FAU: University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)H-Index: 26
view all 12 authors...
Source
#2Alexander Muela (UPV/EHU: University of the Basque Country)H-Index: 8
Last. Iñaki LarreaH-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The fostering of creativity in higher education has been linked to enhanced professional competences and personal development among students. The main aim of this study was to examine the relationship between student engagement and creative self-concept in undergraduates. The sample comprised 775 students (51.61% female, 46.32% male, 2.07% other) from two Spanish universities, ranging in age from 17 to 43 years (M = 20.78, SD = 2.65). Students from the first and final year of various de...
Source
#1Andreia Valquaresma (University of Porto)H-Index: 1
#2Joaquim Luís Coimbra (University of Porto)H-Index: 15
Source
#1Ross AndersonH-Index: 13
#2Matthew R. Graham (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 13
Abstract Divergent thinking can approximate creative potential of individuals and provide a valid way to understand the creative thinking process and creative development. Still, little is known about how the primary factors that make up divergent thinking—fluency, flexibility, and originality—develop during the early stages of adolescence. The dual pathway model suggests that creativity can emerge from both persistence and cognitive flexibility pathways. This study addresses current gaps and te...
Source
BACKGROUND Creativity is linked with educationally relevant constructs such as achievement, intelligence, and motivation. However, very few studies have explored longitudinal links between the constructs or the aetiology of individual differences in childhood creativity. AIMS The study addresses the gap in the literature of developmental studies on the relationship of creativity with other educationally relevant measures. Additionally, the present study is the first adequately powered geneticall...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.