Disclosure of Industry Payments to Physicians: An Epidemiologic Analysis of Early Data From the Open Payments Program

Published on Jan 1, 2016
· DOI :10.1016/J.MAYOCP.2015.10.016
Deborah C. Marshall11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Madeleine E. Jackson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego),
Jona A. Hattangadi-Gluth23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Open Payments program implements Section 6002 of the Affordable Care Act requiring medical product manufacturers to report payments made to physicians or teaching hospitals as well as ownership or investment interests held by physicians in the manufacturer. To determine the characteristics and distribution of these industry payments by specialty, we analyzed physician payments made between August 1, 2013, and December 31, 2013, that were publicly disclosed by Open Payments. We compared payments between specialty types (medical, surgical, and other) and across specialties within each type using the Pearson χ 2 test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The number of physicians receiving payments was compared with the total number of active physicians in each specialty in 2012. We also analyzed physician ownership interests. Allopathic and osteopathic physicians received 2.43 million payments totaling 475 million. General payments represented 90% of payments by total value (30 million) (per-physician median, 100; interquartile range [IQR], 1-273; mean ± SD, 407±23,766), with the remaining 10% (5 million) as research payments (median, 2365; IQR, 92-8550; mean ± SD, 2,880±66,743). Physicians most likely to receive general payments were cardiovascular specialists (78%) and neurosurgeons (77%); those least likely were pathologists (9%). Reports of ownership interest in reporting entities included 10 million in dollar amount invested and $447 million in value of interest held by 2093 physicians. In conclusion, the distribution and characteristics of industry payments to physicians varied widely by specialty during the first half-year of Open Payments reporting.
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#1Andre M. Samuel (Yale University)H-Index: 23
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Background Industry payments made to physicians by drug and device manufacturers or group purchasing organizations are now reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as a part of the Physician Payments Sunshine Act. Initial reports from the program show that orthopaedic surgeons lead all physician specialties in total and average industry payments. However, before further discussion of these payments and their implications can take place, it remains to be seen whether these...
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#1Jonathan S. Chang (CUMC: Columbia University Medical Center)H-Index: 13
Purpose To review data for ophthalmologists published online from the Physician Payments Sunshine Act. Design Retrospective data review using data acquired from a publicly available electronic database. Methods A database was downloaded from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services website under Identified General Payments to Physicians and a primary specialty of ophthalmology. Basic statistical analysis was performed including mean, median, and range of payments for both single payments a...
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ObjectiveTo characterize nonresearch payments made by industry to otolaryngologists in order to explore how the potential for conflicts of interests varies among otolaryngologists and compares betw...
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#1Sachin Santhakumar (Brown University)H-Index: 1
#2Eli Y. Adashi (Brown University)H-Index: 80
On September 30, 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the Open Payment Program (OPP) database, replete with payments made to physicians and teaching hospitals by manufacturers of federally covered drugs, devices, biologics, or medical supplies.1 Physician ownership or investment interest in manufacturers or in group purchasing organizations was also included in the database.1 In so doing, CMS complied with Section 6002 (Transparency Reports and Reporting of Physician...
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The Open Payments program is a government initiative through which financial relationships between applicable industries and covered physicians or teaching hospitals are publicly reported. The program does not assess these relationships but rather facilitates transparency and allows stakeholders to use this information in making informed decisions. This article outlines the program and its goals, reviews its requirements and when they go into effect, examines the implications for physicians and ...
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#1Mark J. Ratain (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 104
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