Person versus process praise and criticism: implications for contingent self-worth and coping.

Published on Jan 1, 1999in Developmental Psychology
3.85
· DOI :10.1037/0012-1649.35.3.835
Melissa L. Kamins1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CU: Columbia University),
Carol S. Dweck95
Estimated H-index: 95
()
Source
Abstract
Conventional wisdom suggests that praising a child as a whole or praising his or her traits is beneficial. Two studies tested the hypothesis that both criticism and praise that conveyed person or trait judgments could send a message of contingent worth and undermine subsequent coping. In Study 1, 67 children (ages 5-6 years) role-played tasks involving a setback and received 1 of 3 forms of criticism after each task: person, outcome, or process criticism. In Study 2, 64 children role-played successful tasks and received either person, outcome, or process praise. In both studies, self-assessments, affect, and persistence were measured on a subsequent task involving a setback. Results indicated that children displayed significantly more helpless responses (including self-blame) on all dependent measures after person criticism or praise than after process criticism or praise. Thus person feedback, even when positive, can create vulnerability and a sense of contingent self-worth.
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