The Role of Models in Women's Professional Development*

Published on Sep 1, 1976in Psychology of Women Quarterly
· DOI :10.1111/j.1471-6402.1976.tb00805.x
Elizabeth Douvan7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UM: University of Michigan)
Sources
Abstract
If modeling represents a significant process in socializing candidates to professions, the question arises as to how young women have negotiated the acquisition of professional identities in fields where there are no (or virtually no) established women to serve as models. This article explores aspects of the situation of women in male-dominated fields; the techniques of adaptation they use and the effects on the intellectual styles and personal integrations women develop in these circumstances.
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