Test format and corrective feedback modify the effect of testing on long-term retention

Published on Jul 2, 2007in European Journal of Cognitive Psychology
· DOI :10.1080/09541440601056620
Sean H. K. Kang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis),
Kathleen B. McDermott64
Estimated H-index: 64
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis),
Henry L. Roediger117
Estimated H-index: 117
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Sources
Abstract
We investigated the effects of format of an initial test and whether or not students received corrective feedback on that test on a final test of retention 3 days later. In Experiment 1, subjects studied four short journal papers. Immediately after reading each paper, they received either a multiple choice (MC) test, a short answer (SA) test, a list of statements to read, or a filler task. The MC test, SA test, and list of statements tapped identical facts from the studied material. No feedback was provided during the initial tests. On a final test 3 days later (consisting of MC and SA questions), having had an intervening MC test led to better performance than an intervening SA test, but the intervening MC condition did not differ significantly from the read statements condition. To better equate exposure to test-relevant information, corrective feedback during the initial tests was introduced in Experiment 2. With feedback provided, having had an intervening SA test led to the best performance on the fi...
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