Suphamai Bunnapradist
University of California, Los Angeles
Internal medicineUrologySurgeryRenal functionRetrospective cohort studyIntensive care medicineImmunologyHazard ratioKidney diseaseDialysisKidneyImmunosuppressionKidney transplantationPopulationTacrolimusTransplantationKidney transplantIncidence (epidemiology)Proportional hazards modelDiabetes mellitusMedicineGastroenterology
234Publications
62H-index
6,934Citations
Publications 235
Newest
#1Erik L. Lum (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 9
#2Karid Nieves-Borrero (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 1
Last. Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
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#1Marcelo Santos Sampaio (Veterans Health Administration)H-Index: 20
#2Erik L. Lum (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 9
Last. Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
view all 5 authors...
A small pediatric deceased donor (SPD) weight cut-off whether to transplant as en bloc (EB) or single pediatric (SP) kidney is uncertain. Using UNOS/OPTN data (2000-2019), 27,875 SPDs were divided by 1) EB (11.4%) or SP (88.6%) and 2) donor weight (≤10 [5.4%], >10-15 [8.3%], >15-18 [3.7%], >18-20 [2.9%], and >20 kg [79.7%]). SP>20 kg and adult deceased donors (grouped by Kidney Donor Profile Index; KDPI null 85) were used as references. The primary outcome was ten-year graft failure. In SP 20 kg...
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#1Piyavadee Homkrailas (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 1
#2Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
White kidney transplant candidates have the highest pre-transplant mortality rate compared to other ethnicities. The reason for a higher mortality rate is not well understood. Estimated post transplant survival (EPTS) score has been used to predict patient survival after transplant and may be associated with pre-transplant survival. First-time kidney transplant candidates listed between 2015-2018 were identified from the OPTN database. Individuals listed for multiple organs, at multiple centers,...
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#1Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
#2Piyavadee Homkrailas (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 1
Last. Hossein Tabriziani (Natera)
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#1Gabriel M. Danovitch (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 65
#2Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
Last. Flavio Vincenti (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 83
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We welcome the availability and approval of tests designed for the non-invasive detection of the presence or absence of kidney transplant rejection. Currently three such tests are commercially available: Allosure by CareDx and Prospera by Natera detect donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) in blood,1 and Trugraf by Transplant Genomics detects differentially expressed genes.2 Each of these tests cost approximately $3000 paid by Medicare with US tax dollars and patient co-pays.3.
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#1Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
#2Nakul Datta (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 6
Last. Erik L. Lum (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 9
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Beyond its widely recognized morbidity and mortality, coronavirus disease 2019 poses an additional health risk to renal allograft recipients. Detection and measurement of donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA), expressed as a fraction of the total cell-free DNA (cfDNA), has emerged as a noninvasive biomarker for allograft rejection. Here, we present a case report of a patient who was infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, 11 mo post-kidney transplant. The patient was seri...
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#1Wisit Cheungpasitporn (Mayo Clinic)H-Index: 30
Last. David A. AxelrodH-Index: 46
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While kidney transplantation improves the long-term survival of the majority of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), age-related immune dysfunction and associated comorbidities make older transplant recipients more susceptible to complications related to immunosuppression. In this review, we discuss appropriate management of immunosuppressive agents in older adults to minimize adverse events, avoid acute rejection, and maximize patient and graft survival. Physiological changes associat...
2 CitationsSource
#1Joanna SchaenmanH-Index: 16
#2Maura Rossetti (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 15
Last. Steve W. Cole (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 75
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After kidney transplantation, infection and death are important clinical complications, especially for the growing numbers of older patients with limited resilience to withstand adverse events. Evaluation of changes in gene expression in immune cells can reveal the underlying mechanisms behind vulnerability to infection. A cohort of 60 kidney transplant recipients was evaluated. Gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells 3 months after kidney transplantation was analyzed to compare di...
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Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection continues to negatively affect outcomes for solid organ transplant recipients, despite the advent of strategies for preemptive surveillance and prophylaxis. The impact is especially great for CMV seronegative recipients of donor seropositive organs, who typically lack the ability to control CMV infection at the time of transplantation. Methods We reviewed episodes of CMV DNAemia in a modern cohort of kidney transplant recipients over a 3-year period at ...
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#1Piyavadee Homkrailas (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 1
#2Marcelo Santos Sampaio (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 20
Last. Suphamai Bunnapradist (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 62
view all 5 authors...
Obesity in deceased kidney donors is a known risk factor for poor allograft outcomes. The Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) has been introduced to predict graft survival in deceased donor kidney transplantation (DDKT). Obesity, however, is not included in KDPI. We study the impact of donor obesity on DDKT outcomes after adjusting for organ quality by KDPI. The Organ Procurement Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS) data of DDKT from 2005-2017, with donor BMI ≥18.5 ...
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