Ashwani Monga
Rutgers University
AdvertisingHeuristicsProduct (category theory)CurrencySociologyBusinessPsychologyActuarial scienceEconomicsMarketingHeuristicMicroeconomicsImpact biasCognitive psychologyBoundary value problemConsumer behaviourConstrual level theoryPatienceWait timeProcess (engineering)PhenomenonMonetary economicsSocial psychology
45Publications
10H-index
465Citations
Publications 34
Newest
#1Rafay A. SiddiquiH-Index: 3
#2Ashwani MongaH-Index: 10
Last. Eva C. BuechelH-Index: 8
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#1Ozum ZorH-Index: 1
#2Rafay A. SiddiquiH-Index: 3
Last. Ashwani MongaH-Index: 10
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#1Rafay A. SiddiquiH-Index: 3
#2Frank MayH-Index: 7
Last. Ashwani MongaH-Index: 10
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#1Frank May (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 7
#2Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 10
Last. Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 3
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This article introduces time anthropomorphism: a tendency to imbue time with humanlike mental states (e.g., time has a will of its own). This tendency, which varies across individuals and may also be induced, changes patience (e.g., for standard over expedited shipping). Specifically, time anthropomorphism reduces patience for low-power (but not high-power) individuals because anthropomorphism makes the aversive force of wait time seem more potent (i.e., more aversive) to those who feel less pot...
44 CitationsSource
#1Rafay A. Siddiqui (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 3
#2Frank May (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 7
Last. Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 10
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Abstract Individuals often estimate the duration of tasks that others are engaged in (time a colleague would take to write a report, time a spouse would take to get dressed for a party, etc.). Construal-level theory suggests that thinking about ‘how’ (vs. ‘why’) a task is to be completed shrinks duration estimates. We argue that this effect arises for simple tasks, but complex tasks yield a reversal. Specifically, because ‘how’ participants are more attuned to the greater number of steps require...
15 CitationsSource
#1Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 10
#1Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 3
Last. Rajesh Bagchi (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 14
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Quantitative changes may be conveyed to consumers using small units (e.g., change in delivery time from 7 to 21 days) or large units (1-3 weeks). Numerosity research suggests that changes are magnified by small (vs. large) units because a change from 7 to 21 (vs. 1-3) seems larger. We introduce a reverse effect that we term unitosity: changes are magnified by large (vs. small) units because a change of weeks (vs. days) seems larger. We show that numerosity reverses to unitosity when relative sal...
68 CitationsSource
#1Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 10
#1Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 3
Last. Mona Srivastava (Harvard University)H-Index: 2
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People frequently overestimate the impact of an event when they imagine it, relative to when they actually experience it. This phenomenon, known as the impact bias, has been well established as an intrapersonal phenomenon. We extend it to the inherently interpersonal marketing setting involving buyer–seller dyads in which the two entities are bound by a relationship, and propose a moderating effect based on the strength of the buyer–seller relationship. An online panel study and three laboratory...
6 CitationsSource
#1Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 10
#1Ashwani Monga (USC: University of South Carolina)H-Index: 3
Last. Mona Sinha (Harvard University)
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