Duncan Thomas
Duke University
Labour economicsSocioeconomic statusDemographyPsychologyEconomicsSurvey data collectionGeographyHuman capitalTest (assessment)Quality (business)PopulationFamily lifeAffect (psychology)Demographic economicsSocioeconomicsEconomic growthFertilityMedicineDeveloping countryEnvironmental health
282Publications
71H-index
15.1kCitations
Publications 243
Newest
#1Duncan Thomas (Duke University)H-Index: 71
#2Tyson H. Brown (Duke University)H-Index: 15
Last. Rachel E. KrantonH-Index: 24
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Levels and distributions of depression symptoms 8-10 months after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in a population of faculty, staff, and students at Duke University who faced minimal infection and economic disruption due to the pandemic. Almost 5,000 respondents age 18-81 years who completed the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) battery reported high rates of depression symptoms with more than 40% reporting levels that indicate risk of moderate depress...
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#1Elizabeth Frankenberg (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 31
#2Cecep SumantriH-Index: 7
Last. Duncan Thomas (Duke University)H-Index: 71
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Exposure to disasters and other extreme events is rising across the globe, but the impact on long-term mortality risks of affected populations is not established. We examine how mortality and individual-specific traumatic exposures at the time of the disaster affect mortality risks of survivors over the subsequent ten years, using data from Aceh, Indonesia, collected before and after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Across communities, the higher the percentage of individuals killed in the tsunami...
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#1Daniel LaFaveH-Index: 7
#2Evan D. PeetH-Index: 6
Last. Duncan ThomasH-Index: 71
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The farm household model, in which decisions about production and consumption are made simultaneously, lies at the heart of many models of development. Empirically modelling these simultaneous choices is not straightforward. The vast majority of empirical studies assume that farm households behave as if markets are complete in which case decision-making simplifies to a recursive system where consumption choices can be treated as if they are made after all production decisions. Previous empirical...
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#1Daniel LaFave (Colby College)H-Index: 7
#2Evan D. Peet (AN: RAND Corporation)H-Index: 6
Last. Duncan Thomas (Duke University)H-Index: 71
view all 0 authors...
The farm household model, in which decisions about production and consumption are made simultaneously, lies at the heart of many models of development. Empirically modelling these simultaneous choices is not straightforward. The vast majority of empirical studies assume that farm households behave as if markets are complete in which case decision-making simplifies to a recursive system where consumption choices can be treated as if they are made after all production decisions. Previous empirical...
#1Ryan Brown (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 5
#2Veronica Montalva (BID: Inter-American Development Bank)H-Index: 4
Last. Andrea Velasquez (Duke University)H-Index: 5
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Whereas attitudes towards risk are thought to play an important role in many decisions over the life-course, factors that affect those attitudes are not fully understood. Using longitudinal survey data collected in Mexico before and during the Mexican war on drugs, we investigate how an individual’s risk attitudes change with variation in levels of insecurity and uncertainty brought on by unprecedented changes in local-area violent crime due to the war on drugs. Exploiting the fact that the timi...
6 CitationsSource
Extremely rich data on farm households in Burkina Faso are used to test whether resource are allocated Pareto efficiently. The complexity of household structures, including multi-generation and polygynous households, is taken into account to developing tests from theoretical models of behavior. Credible measures of bargaining power are constructed exploiting the fact that individuals within a household have well-defined property rights over the plots they own. Using data on consumption choices, ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Zhanghua ChenH-Index: 15
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#1Zhanghua ChenH-Index: 15
#1Zhanghua ChenH-Index: 1
Last. Frank D. GillilandH-Index: 101
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Air pollutants (AP) exposures have been associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases; however, the exact mechanism is unclear. In this study, we examined the association between AP ex...
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#1Duncan Thomas (Duke University)H-Index: 71
#2Teresa E. Seeman (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 129
Last. Elizabeth Frankenberg (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 31
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ABSTRACTGlycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assays with venous blood and dried blood spots (DBS) are compared for 143 paired samples collected in Aceh, Indonesia. Relative to gold-standard venous-blood values, DBS-based values reported by the HPLC are systematically upward biased for HbA1c<8% and the fraction diabetic (HbA1c ≥ 6.5%) is overstated almost five-fold. Inspection of chromatograms from DBS assays indicates the % glycosylated calcula...
3 CitationsSource
#1Duncan Thomas (Duke University)H-Index: 71
#2Elizabeth Frankenberg (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 31
Last. Cecep SumantriH-Index: 7
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Background Stress is associated with elevated cardiometabolic health risks, but establishing a causal mechanism is challenging, and evidence of the longer-term effects of large-scale stressors on health is limited. To fill these gaps, we investigated the effect of elevated stress from direct exposure to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami on diabetes risk 12 years later. The Indian Ocean tsunami destroyed the built and natural environment along coastal Aceh, Indonesia, killed 5% of the popula...
1 CitationsSource