Stephanie M. Noble
University of Tennessee
AdvertisingService providerFeelingProduct (category theory)Word of mouthSociologyBusinessPsychologyMarketingCognitionWork (electrical)ReactanceQualitative researchPersonal spaceSurvey data collectionPerceptionControl (management)Value (economics)LoyaltyProduction (economics)Test (assessment)Context (language use)Service (business)Affect (psychology)Public relationsProcess (engineering)Sample (statistics)Product (business)Marketing researchRelationship marketingKnowledge managementSocial psychologyMarketing strategyDigital marketing
58Publications
22H-index
2,716Citations
Publications 57
Newest
#1Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
Last. David A. Griffith (Lehigh University)H-Index: 44
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Companies are encouraging customers to participate in the process of creating and delivering their offering(s). In this strategy, not only do providers select a level of customer co-production, but also the level of customer control. This study examines the effects of control types (cognitive, behavioral, and decisional) and their interaction on customers’ affective responses in service operations with varying levels of co-production. An extensive two-study design, across two service contexts, t...
19 CitationsSource
#1Carol L. EsmarkH-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. NobleH-Index: 22
Last. John E. BellH-Index: 17
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Purpose This paper aims to examine the impact of an open loyalty programme (anyone can join) versus a selective programme (requirements must be met) to show what types of loyalty programmes are most effective. In-group identification, gratitude, stage of relationship and visibility are additionally examined. Design/methodology/approach Two studies use experimental methodology to initially test the relationships. A third study uses survey and panel data. Findings Open programmes lead to more in-g...
10 CitationsSource
#1Erin Adamson Gillespie (Elon University)H-Index: 5
#2Katie Hybnerova (University of North Alabama)H-Index: 1
Last. Stephanie M. Noble (College of Business Administration)H-Index: 22
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While there has been extensive research on deception, extant literature has not examined how deception is processed solely from the customer's perspective. Extensive qualitative interviews were conducted and analyzed to inform the proposed framework. Cognitive dissonance theory and attribution theory are used to frame the process consumers go through when deception is perceived. When consumers perceive deceit, they will consider attribution before determining intentionality. Internal attribution...
10 CitationsSource
#1Erin Adamson Gillespie (Elon University)H-Index: 5
#2Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
Last. Son K. Lam (UGA: University of Georgia)H-Index: 19
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This research contrasts two approaches to managing multi-brand salesperson efforts: (1) the extrinsic approach via a brand-specific quota emphasis, and (2) the intrinsic approach via salesperson brand identification. Using multi-source data from a large food distributor, we uncover how and when each approach is more effective. First, beyond its direct and indirect positive effects on salesperson brand-specific effort through salesperson brand psychological ownership, a brand-specific quota empha...
15 CitationsSource
#1Christy Ashley (URI: University of Rhode Island)H-Index: 9
#2Erin Adamson Gillespie (Elon University)H-Index: 5
Last. Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
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Retailers may introduce loyalty program enrollment fees for several reasons, including to offset the costs of the program. The principle of commitment-consistency and sunk cost effects, which suggest consumers who pay a fee-paying consumers have a higher value to the firm and exhibit behavioral loyalty, while the zero-price effect predicts the opposite. Three studies show: consumers who pay to participate in a loyalty program have more favorable attitudes, more positive evaluations of value for ...
12 CitationsSource
#1Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
#2Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
This article builds on years of work studying territoriality and conflict issues between customers and employees in retail and service settings. The key contribution of this research is to illustrate the bad behaviors and conflicts that take place in retail spaces between customers, between customers and employees, and between employees. Using multi-methods of data collection—critical incident technique, interviews, mystery shoppers, and surveys—the authors outline these bad behaviors and confli...
4 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer L. Stevens (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 4
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
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Customer participation has become an important firm strategy (Bendapudi and Leone 2003; Vargo and Lusch 2004). Companies are designing their offering(s) to allow customers to participate to various degrees in the process of creating and delivering the offering(s). In this strategy, not only do providers select a level of customer co-production, but also the level of control available to customers. This study examines the effects of control types (cognitive, behavioral, and decisional) and their ...
Source
#1Stephanie M. Noble (UT: University of Tennessee)H-Index: 22
#2Carol L. Esmark (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 9
Last. Christy Ashley (ECU: East Carolina University)H-Index: 9
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Closing time for a retailer or service provider represents a time when a store is in transition from an open domain to a closed domain. During this time, employees’ tasks change from primarily serving customers to managing their closing time activities while concurrently serving customers. As such, shoppers are impacted by employee actions and closing time duties, often in a negative way. We found through our research that customers act with retaliatory, territorial behaviors, and employees repo...
2 CitationsSource
#1Mary P. HarrisonH-Index: 6
#2Sharon E. BeattyH-Index: 54
Last. Stephanie M. NobleH-Index: 22
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Customers stay in relationships for all sorts of reasons. Not all of these reasons are because of the strong satisfaction with the service or service provider (Colgate, Tong, Lee, and Farley 2007; Jones, Reynolds, Mothersbaugh, and Beatty 2007). According to Bendapudi and Berry (1997), some customers stay in relationships because of a sense of dedication (dedication-based relationships), while others stay because they feel they cannot easily get out of the relationship due to various constraints...
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#1Stephanie M. NobleH-Index: 22
#2Diana L. HaytkoH-Index: 15
Last. Joanna PhillipsH-Index: 5
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Generation Y will represent an estimated 41% of the population by 2009 (Welles 1999). These consumers currently range from 11 to 28. They have the purchasing power to have an unprecedented impact on the economy. Despite the potential of this group as a whole, especially those middle members of this generation (ages 16–22) who are in or near entering the highly coveted college-student market, little is known about the motivations behind the consumption behavior and preferences of these individual...
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