Carey K. Morewedge
Boston University
Public economicsExperimental psychologyFeelingSocial perceptionConsumption (economics)Developmental psychologyAttributionBusinessEconometricsArtificial intelligencePsychologyHealth careActuarial scienceEconomicsCognitionSelfMicroeconomicsImpact biasCognitive psychologyCognitive biasPerceptionPsychological interventionAffective forecastingHappinessDebiasingEvent (probability theory)Game designSocial psychologySocial cognition
100Publications
27H-index
3,073Citations
Publications 89
Newest
#1Karim S. KassamH-Index: 17
#2Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
Last. Daniel T. GilbertH-Index: 65
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#1Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
#2Leif HoltzmanH-Index: 1
Last. Nicholas EpleyH-Index: 57
view all 3 authors...
Consumption depletes one's available resources, but consumers may be unaware of the total resources available for consumption and, therefore, be influenced by the temporary accessibility of resource accounts. Consistent with this possibility, consumers in four experiments perceived a unit of consumption to be smaller and consequently consumed more, when large resource accounts of money, calories, or time (e.g., the money in their savings account) were made temporarily accessible compared with wh...
108 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (Princeton University)H-Index: 27
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 79
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The hedonic benefit of a gain (e.g., receiving 100) may be increased by segregating it into smaller unitsthat are distributed over time (e.g., receiving 0 on each of 2 days). However, if these units are too small(e.g., receiving 1¢ on each of 10,000 days), they may fall beneath the person’s hedonic limen and haveno hedonic benefit at all. Do people know where their limens lie? In 6 experiments, participants predictedthat the hedonic benefit of a large gain would be increased by segregating it...
24 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (Princeton University)H-Index: 27
#2Jesse Lee Preston (UWO: University of Western Ontario)H-Index: 15
Last. Daniel M. Wegner (Harvard University)H-Index: 87
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In this research, the authors found that people use speed of movement to infer the presence of mind and mental attributes such as intention, consciousness, thought, and intelligence in other persons, animals, and objects. Participants in 4 studies exhibited timescale bias—perceiving human and nonhuman targets (animals, robots, and animations) as more likely to possess mental states when those targets moved at speeds similar to the speed of natural human movement, compared with when targets perfo...
189 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. Morewedge (Harvard University)H-Index: 27
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 79
view all 3 authors...
Atypical events are both memorable and unrepresentative of their class. We tested the hypotheses that (a) people tend to recall atypical instances of events, and (b) when they are unaware of this, they rely on these atypical instances in forecasting their affective reactions to future events. In three studies, participants who were asked to recall an instance of an event and participants who were asked to recall an atypical instance of an event recalled equally atypical instances. However, only ...
246 CitationsSource
#1Nicholas Epley (Harvard University)H-Index: 57
#2Carey K. Morewedge (Harvard University)H-Index: 27
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 49
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Children generally behave more egocentrically than adults when assessing another's perspective. We argue that this difference does not, however, indicate that adults process information less egocentrically than children, but rather that adults are better able to subsequently correct an initial egocentric interpretation. An experiment tracking participants' eye movements during a referential communication task indicated that children and adults were equally quick to interpret a spoken instruction...
561 CitationsSource
#1Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
#2Carey K. Morewedge (Harvard University)H-Index: 27
Last. Timothy D. WilsonH-Index: 79
view all 4 authors...
Decisions are powerfully affected by anticipated regret, and people anticipate feeling more regret when they lose by a narrow margin than when they lose by a wide margin. But research suggests that people are remarkably good at avoiding self-blame, and hence they may be better at avoiding regret than they realize. Four studies measured people's anticipations and experiences of regret and self-blame. In Study 1, students overestimated how much more regret they would feel when they “nearly won” th...
287 CitationsSource
#1Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
#2Matthew D. Lieberman (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 95
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 79
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Intense hedonic states trigger psychological processes that are designed to attenuate them, and thus intense states may abate more quickly than mild states. Because people are unaware of these psychological processes, they may mistakenly expect intense states to last longer than mild ones. In Study 1, participants predicted that the more they initially disliked a transgressor, the longer their dislike would last. In Study 2, participants predicted that their dislike for a transgressor who hurt t...
249 CitationsSource