Carey K. Morewedge
Boston University
Public economicsExperimental psychologyFeelingSocial perceptionConsumption (economics)Developmental psychologyAttributionBusinessEconometricsArtificial intelligencePsychologyHealth careActuarial scienceEconomicsCognitionSelfMicroeconomicsImpact biasCognitive psychologyCognitive biasPerceptionPsychological interventionAffective forecastingHappinessDebiasingEvent (probability theory)Game designSocial psychologySocial cognition
100Publications
27H-index
3,073Citations
Publications 89
Newest
#1Ximena Garcia-RadaH-Index: 5
#2Sarah WhitleyH-Index: 1
Last. Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
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#1Masha KsendzovaH-Index: 5
#2Michael I. NortonH-Index: 71
Last. Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
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#1Young Eun Huh (HKUST: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 5
#2Joachim Vosgerau (Bocconi University)H-Index: 14
Last. Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
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AbstractEating a food reduces the desire to eat more of that food. General-process theories of motivation posit that eating a food also increases the motivation to eat other foods—an effect known as cross-stimulus sensitization. The authors propose that eating a food selectively sensitizes consumers to its complements rather than to all foods. Eating a food activates a goal to consume foods that consumers perceive to be well paired with the consumed food. In five experiments, imagined and actual...
9 CitationsSource
#1Meg Barton (Leidos)H-Index: 3
#2Carl Symborski (SAIC: Science Applications International Corporation)H-Index: 4
Last. James H. KorrisH-Index: 4
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In the current study, a serious game was developed to address a training challenge: teaching players to recognize and mitigate their cognitive biases. Cognitive biases, which are human tendencies to commit systematic errors in thinking that lead to irrational judgments, are deeply ingrained and difficult to alter. This paper describes the theory-based approach we employed to create a game for the mitigation of cognitive biases – a challenging and abstract training topic. A cognitive bias framewo...
7 CitationsSource
#1Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
#2Simone TangH-Index: 4
Last. Richard P. LarrickH-Index: 37
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We examined whether people reduce the impact of negative outcomes through emotional hedging—betting against the occurrence of desired outcomes. We found substantial reluctance to bet against the success of preferred U.S. presidential candidates and Major League Baseball, National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball, and NCAA hockey teams. This reluctance was not attributable to optimism or a general aversion to hedging. Reluctance to hedge desired outcomes...
12 CitationsSource
#1Tatiana Lau (Harvard University)H-Index: 6
#2Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
Last. Mina Cikara (Harvard University)H-Index: 21
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Plural societies require individuals to forecast how others—both in-group and out-group members—will respond to gains and setbacks. Typically, correcting affective forecasts to include more relevant information improves their accuracy by reducing their extremity. In contrast, we found that providing affective forecasters with social-category information about their targets made their forecasts more extreme and therefore less accurate. In both political and sports contexts, forecasters across fiv...
6 CitationsSource
#1Irene ScopellitiH-Index: 8
#2Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
Last. Karim S. KassamH-Index: 17
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Source
#1Heather Barry Kappes (LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science)H-Index: 12
#2Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
People spend a considerable amount of their time mentally simulating experiences other than the one in which they are presently engaged, as a means of distraction, coping, or preparation for the future. In this integrative review, we examine four (non-exhaustive) cases in which mentally simulating an experience serves a different function, as a substitute for the corresponding experience. In each case, mentally simulating an experience evokes similar cognitive, physiological, and/or behavioral c...
20 CitationsSource
#1Young Eun Huh (HKUST: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 5
#2Joachim Vosgerau (Bocconi University)H-Index: 14
Last. Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
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When people cannot get what they want, they often satisfy their desire by consuming a substitute. Substitutes can originate from within the taxonomic category of the desired stimulus (i.e., within-category substitutes) or from a different taxonomic category that serves the same basic goal (i.e., cross-category substitutes). Both a store-brand chocolate (within-category substitute) and a granola bar (cross-category substitute), for example, can serve as substitutes for gourmet chocolate. Here, we...
12 CitationsSource