Concha Cano-Díaz
King Juan Carlos University
Ecological nicheEcosystemLichenRelative species abundanceBiogeographyBiodiversityClimate changeEcosystem healthMicrobiomeAridSoil waterLibrary scienceNutrient cyclePhylotypeWork (electrical)Political scienceEcologyGlobal changeGeographyUrban ecosystemGrasslandGlobeMediterranean BasinMelainabacteriaNostocCyanobacteriaData sharingBiological soil crustScytonemaData interpretationSoil temperatureGlobal distributionBiological sciencesInternational exchangeEuropean researchCompeting interestsResearch councilStatistical analysesEnvironmental scienceDistribution (economics)Greenhouse gasChristian ministrySpecies richnessFood securityBotanyScale (social sciences)Terrestrial ecosystemField experimentBiology
7Publications
4H-index
57Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Concha Cano-Díaz (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 4
#2Fernando T. Maestre (University of Alicante)H-Index: 83
Last. Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 52
view all 8 authors...
O_LISoil cyanobacteria play essential ecological roles and are known to experience large changes in their diversity and abundance throughout early succession. However, much less is known about how and why soil cyanobacterial communities change as soil develops from centuries to millennia, and the effects of aboveground vegetation on these communities. C_LIO_LIWe combined an extensive field survey including 16 global soil chronosequences across contrasting ecosystems (from deserts to tropical for...
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#1Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 52
#2David J. Eldridge (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 68
Last. Adebola R. Bamigboye (OAU: Obafemi Awolowo University)H-Index: 1
view all 36 authors...
The structure and function of the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces remain largely undetermined. We conducted a global field survey in urban greenspaces and neighboring natural ecosystems across 56 cities from six continents, and found that urban soils are important hotspots for soil bacterial, protist and functional gene diversity, but support highly homogenized microbial communities worldwide. Urban greenspaces had a greater proportion of fast-growing bacteria, algae, amoebae, and fungal pa...
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M.D.-B. is supported by a Ramon y Cajal grant from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (RYC2018-025483-I), and by the BES grant agreement No LRB17\1019 (MUSGONET). The work of C.C.-D. and F.T.M. and the global drylands database were supported by the European Research Council [ERC Grant Agreements 242658 (BIOCOM) and 647038 (BIODESERT)] and by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (BIOMOD project, ref. CGL2013-44661-R). F.T.M. acknowledges support from Generalitat Valenci...
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#1Marina Dacal (University of Alicante)H-Index: 6
#2Pablo García-Palacios (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 29
Last. Fernando T. Maestre (University of Alicante)H-Index: 83
view all 7 authors...
Soil carbon losses to the atmosphere through soil respiration are expected to rise with ongoing temperature increases, but available evidence from mesic biomes suggests that such response disappears after a few years of experimental warming. However, there is lack of empirical basis for these temporal dynamics in soil respiration responses, and for the mechanisms underlying them, in drylands, which collectively form the largest biome on Earth and store 32% of the global soil organic carbon pool....
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#1Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 52
#2Carlos A. Guerra (MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)H-Index: 23
Last. Fernando T. Maestre (University of Alicante)H-Index: 83
view all 8 authors...
Understanding the present and future distribution of soil-borne plant pathogens is critical to supporting food and fibre production in a warmer world. Using data from a global field survey and a nine-year field experiment, we show that warmer temperatures increase the relative abundance of soil-borne potential fungal plant pathogens. Moreover, we provide a global atlas of these organisms along with future distribution projections under different climate change and land-use scenarios. These proje...
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#1Concha Cano-Díaz (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 4
#2Fernando T. Maestre (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 83
Last. Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo (CIRES: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences)H-Index: 52
view all 7 authors...
Cyanobacteria are key organisms in the evolution of life on Earth, but their distribution and environmental preferences in terrestrial ecosystems remain poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is particularly evident for two recently discovered non-photosynthetic cyanobacterial classes, Melainabacteria and Sericytochromatia, limiting our capacity to predict how these organisms and the important ecosystem functions they perform will respond to ongoing global change. Here, we conducted a global ...
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#1Concha Cano-Díaz (UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)H-Index: 4
#2Pilar Mateo (UAM: Autonomous University of Madrid)H-Index: 20
Last. Fernando T. Maestre (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 83
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Cyanobacteria are a key constituent of biocrusts, communities dominated by lichens, mosses and associated microorganisms, which are prevalent in drylands worldwide and that largely determine their functioning. Despite their importance, there are large gaps in our knowledge of the composition and diversity of cyanobacteria associated with biocrusts, particularly in areas such as the Mediterranean Basin. We studied the diversity of these cyanobacteria in a gypsiferous grassland from Centr...
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