James Dale
Massey University
Sexual dimorphismPaternal careMating systemSexual selectionClimate changePsychologySpatial ecologyAgonistic behaviourPredationEcologyRange (biology)GeographyOrnamentsSex characteristicsVariation (linguistics)AggressionQuality (business)PlumagePasserinePopulationQuelea queleaBiological dispersalMate choiceLife history theoryDichromatismEvolutionary biologySelection (genetic algorithm)Dominance (ethology)BiologyZoology
66Publications
25H-index
2,917Citations
Publications 65
Newest
#1William S. Pearman (Massey University)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah J. Wells (Unitec Institute of Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. Nikki E. Freed (Massey University)H-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
Most animal mitochondrial genomes are small, circular, and structurally conserved. However, recent work indicates that diverse taxa possess unusual mitochondrial genomes. In Isopoda, species in multiple lineages have atypical and rearranged mitochondrial genomes. However, more species of this speciose taxon need to be evaluated to understand the evolutionary origins of atypical mitochondrial genomes in this group. In this study, we report the presence of an atypical mitochondrial structure in th...
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#1Justin G. Cally (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 1
#2Devi Stuart-Fox (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 33
Last. Iliana Medina (University of Melbourne)H-Index: 5
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Sexual selection is thought to shape phylogenetic diversity by affecting speciation or extinction rates. However, the net effect of sexual selection on diversification is hard to predict, because many of the hypothesised effects on speciation or extinction have opposing signs and uncertain magnitudes. Theoretical work also suggests that the net effect of sexual selection on diversification should depend strongly on ecological factors, though this prediction has seldom been tested. Here, we test ...
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#1Mihai ValcuH-Index: 23
#2James DaleH-Index: 25
#1Kaspar Delhey (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 27
#2James Dale (Massey University)H-Index: 25
Last. Bart Kempenaers (MPG: Max Planck Society)H-Index: 71
view all 4 authors...
Summary How species will adapt to future climate change is a key question in modern biology. One way to predict such adaptation is to draw from our knowledge of current spatial patterns of phenotypic variation. These are often summarised by different ecogeographical rules that describe how environmental gradients predict geographic variation in form and function. A recent review in Current Biology [ 1 ] synthesises how ecogeographical rules can lead to predictions about future responses to clima...
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#1Sarah J. WellsH-Index: 1
Last. James DaleH-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
#1Nikki E. FreedH-Index: 11
#2William S. PearmanH-Index: 3
Last. Olin K. SilanderH-Index: 19
view all 6 authors...
Accurate determination of animal diets is difficult. Methods such as molecular barcoding or metagenomics offer a promising approach, allowing quantitative and sensitive detection of different taxa. Here we show that rapid and inexpensive diet quantification is possible through metagenomic sequencing with the portable Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) MinION. Using an amplification-free approach, we profiled the stomach contents from 24 wild-caught rats. We conservatively identified diet items f...
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#1William S. Pearman (Massey University)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah J. Wells (Unitec Institute of Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. James Dale (Massey University)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
Population genetic structure in the marine environment can be influenced by life-history traits such as developmental mode (biphasic, with distinct adult and larval morphology, and direct development, in which larvae resemble adults) or habitat specificity, as well as geography and selection. Developmental mode is thought to significantly influence dispersal, with direct developers expected to have much lower dispersal potential. However, this prediction can be complicated by the presence of geo...
Source
#1William S. Pearman (Massey University)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah J. Wells (Unitec Institute of Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. James Dale (Massey University)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
Marine organisms generally develop in one of two ways: biphasic, with distinct adult and larval morphology, and direct development, in which larvae look like adults. The mode of development is thought to significantly influence dispersal, with direct developers having much lower dispersal potential. While dispersal and population connectivity is relatively well understood for biphasic species, comparatively little is known about direct developers. In this study, we use a panel of 8,020 SNPs to i...
Source
#1Diane M. TracyH-Index: 11
#2Douglas SchamelH-Index: 7
Last. James DaleH-Index: 25
view all 3 authors...
#1William S. Pearman (Massey University)H-Index: 3
#2Sarah J. Wells (Unitec Institute of Technology)H-Index: 1
Last. James Dale (Massey University)H-Index: 25
view all 5 authors...
Marine organisms generally develop in one of two ways: biphasic, with distinct adult and larval morphology, and direct development, in which larvae look like adults. The mode of development is thought to significantly influence dispersal, with direct developers having much lower dispersal potential. While dispersal and population connectivity is relatively well understood for biphasic species, comparatively little is known about direct developers. In this study, we use a panel of 8,020 SNPs to i...
Source
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