Simon Milz
Austrian Academy of Sciences
Classical physicsQuantum processQuantum entanglementPhysicsStatistical physicsBasis (linear algebra)Limit (mathematics)Quantum dynamicsQuantum stateMarkov processQuantum informationStructure (mathematical logic)Bipartite graphKolmogorov extension theoremCausal orderObservableMathematicsComputer scienceUnitary stateMultipartite entanglementStochastic processQuantum
26Publications
11H-index
369Citations
Publications 19
Newest
#1Simon Milz (Austrian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Jessica BavarescoH-Index: 6
Last. Giulio ChiribellaH-Index: 34
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The capacity of distant parties to send one another signals is a fundamental requirement in many information-processing tasks. Such ability is determined by the causal structure connecting the parties, and more generally, by the intermediate processes carrying signals from one laboratory to another. Here we build a fully fledged resource theory of causal connection for all multi-party communication scenarios, encompassing those where the parties operate in a definite causal order, and also where...
#1Graeme D. BerkH-Index: 2
#2Simon MilzH-Index: 11
Last. Kavan ModiH-Index: 38
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Noise is possibly the most formidable challenge for quantum technologies. As such, a great deal of effort is dedicated to developing methods for noise reduction. One remarkable achievement in this direction is dynamical decoupling; it details a clear set of instructions for counteracting the effects of quantum noise. Yet, the domain of its applicability remains limited to devices where exercising fast control is possible. In practical terms, this is highly limiting and there is a growing need fo...
#1Simon Milz (Austrian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Kavan Modi (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 38
The field of classical stochastic processes forms a major branch of mathematics. They are, of course, also very well studied in biology, chemistry, ecology, geology, finance, physics, and many more fields of natural and social sciences. When it comes to quantum stochastic processes, however, the topic is plagued with pathological issues that have led to fierce debates amongst researchers. Recent developments have begun to untangle these issues and paved the way for generalizing the theory of cla...
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While spatial quantum correlations have been studied in great detail, much less is known about the genuine quantum correlations that can be exhibited by temporal processes. Employing the quantum comb formalism, processes in time can be mapped onto quantum states, with the crucial difference that temporal correlations have to satisfy causal ordering, while their spatial counterpart is not constrained in the same way. Here, we exploit this equivalence and use the tools of multipartite entanglement...
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#1Simon Milz (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 11
#2Dominic Jurkschat (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 2
Last. Kavan Modi (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 38
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This paper investigates how indefinite causal order arises starting from causally ordered quantum dynamics, and show that quantum entanglement enhances the robustness of such realizations.
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#1Simon Milz (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 11
#2Dario Egloff (TUD: Dresden University of Technology)H-Index: 11
Last. Susana F. HuelgaH-Index: 51
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A new paradigm for separating what is inherently quantum from what is classical relies solely on observable quantities and makes it possible to identify the mechanisms leading to nonclassicality in a wide range of situations.
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#1Simon Milz (Austrian Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Dominic JurkschatH-Index: 2
Last. Kavan ModiH-Index: 38
view all 4 authors...
Recent frameworks describing quantum mechanics in the absence of a global causal order admit the existence of causally indefinite processes, where it is impossible to ascribe causal order for events A and B. These frameworks even allow for processes that violate the so-called causal inequalities, which are analogous to Bell's inequalities. However, the physicality of these exotic processes is, in the general case, still under debate, bringing into question their foundational relevance. While it ...
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#1Simon Milz (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 11
#2Fattah Sakuldee (MU: Mahidol University)H-Index: 4
Last. Kavan Modi (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 38
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In classical physics, the Kolmogorov extension theorem lays the foundation for the theory of stochastic processes. It has been known for a long time that, in its original form, this theorem does not hold in quantum mechanics. More generally, it does not hold in any theory of stochastic processes -- classical, quantum or beyond -- that does not just describe passive observations, but allows for active interventions. Such processes form the basis of the study of causal modelling across the science...
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#1Simon MilzH-Index: 11
#2Dario EgloffH-Index: 11
Last. Susana F. HuelgaH-Index: 51
view all 7 authors...
#1Simon Milz (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 11
#2Myungshik Kim (ICL: Imperial College London)H-Index: 66
Last. Kavan Modi (Monash University, Clayton campus)H-Index: 38
view all 4 authors...
In the classical domain, it is well-known that divisibility does not imply that a stochastic process is Markovian. However, for quantum processes, divisibility is often considered to be synonymous with Markovianity. We show that completely positive (CP) divisible quantum processes can still involve non-Markovian temporal correlations, that we then fully classify using the recently developed process tensor formalism, which generalizes the theory of stochastic processes to the quantum domain.
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