Mark Roorda
Department of War Studies, King's College London
Strategic bombingRisk analysis (engineering)EngineeringWorld War IIBusinessOrganizational learningCyberwarfareOffensivePolitical sciencePhase (combat)Organizational structureProportionality (law)Public international lawLaw and economicsStructure (mathematical logic)Systems engineeringIntercontinental ballistic missileProportionality (mathematics)MandateControl (management)DoctrineState (polity)JudgementUse of forceVirtueDemiseInternational humanitarian lawLawfareHybrid warfareHuman judgmentHuman controlLaw of armed conflictLegal normState of artComputer securityComputer scienceAdversaryOperations researchProcess (engineering)LegitimacyInternational lawDroneAutonomy
10Publications
3H-index
14Citations
Publications 9
Newest
#1J.C. van den Boogaard (UvA: University of Amsterdam)
#2Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
There is an ongoing debate on whether and how the use of certain emerging weapon technologies perceived as decreasingly allowing human control over the use of force should be regulated or banned. The focus of the debate on such so-called autonomous weapon systems has from the outset been too narrow and misguided. The frame of ‘autonomy’ and the resulting weapon-centric focus on control, neglects that the effects of the military use of weapons may be controlled in many more ways than by restricti...
Source
#1Frans P. B. OsingaH-Index: 5
#2Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
The targeting process involves a complex series of decisions concerning the use of destructive force against specific objects or people. This process underlies the offensive employment of airpower and the unprecedented ability to control military force. The current state of art of targeting derives from a long evolutionary process that is intertwined with the history of air warfare. Awareness of this evolution will indicate challenges and trends that will aid understanding current targeting prac...
Source
#1Terry GillH-Index: 7
#2Jelle van HaasterH-Index: 3
Last. Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
Remote warfare has evolved from the use of strategic airpower to attack an enemy’s economic infrastructure in World War II and the role of intercontinental ballistic missile systems in promoting strategic deterrence during the Cold War to the use of contemporary weapons systems and techniques, such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles ( a.k.a. UAVs or ‘drones’) and cyber warfare which are designed to carry out strikes against targets far removed from a traditional battlefield, disrupt an adversary’s comm...
Source
#1J. van HaasterH-Index: 1
#2Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
In this article the authors will describe how certain non-traditional means and methods could be used to undermine a military’s capacity to respond effectively to an emerging threat. They will do so by focussing on the Netherlands and showing how some of its specific (non-military) vulnerabilities may be targeted by opponents using non-traditional means in an indirect manner. They will structure the sequence of events along an artificial 30-day period leading up to ‘D-day’. Starting at D minus 3...
#1Frans P. B. OsingaH-Index: 5
#2Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
Through the prism of the experience of air warfare, this chapter identifies key factors that have shaped targeting. These include technological developments, organizational structures, and processes and inter-service competition for scarce resources. Moreover, targeting is informed by perspectives on the nature of the political mandate and objectives, by the type of war, by intelligence on the nature of the opponent, and by assumptions that are derived from experience, doctrine, or strategic the...
Source
#1Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
#2Jelle van HaasterH-Index: 3
#1James M AndersonH-Index: 1
#2Benoit ArbourH-Index: 1
Last. Christian ZinnerH-Index: 8
view all 19 authors...
#1Mark Roorda (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 3
The prospect of the use of so-called autonomous weapon systems has raised significant legal and moral concerns. This chapter contributes to the debate by providing an alternative perspective to the current dominant focus on the technological capabilities of future weapons. The author argues that machines do not have to be able to distinguish and make proportionality calculations. No rule in IHL requires weapons to do so. It is ‘merely’ the effects of attack decisions that need to be in accordanc...
#1Mark RoordaH-Index: 3
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.