Shalini Sarin Jain
University of Washington
Competence (human resources)MalleabilityFinanceSocioemotional selectivity theoryBusiness ethicsComparative advertisingBusinessSocial responsibilityOutcome (game theory)TrustworthinessPsychologySalience (language)Political sciencePersonalityCustomer satisfactionLeadership styleLawMoralityPerspective (graphical)Power (social and political)Representation (politics)Job interviewHigher PowerLeverage (negotiation)MistakeSexual misconductSanctionsQuality of Life ResearchGender diversityClosing (real estate)DeckOrganizational justiceDiversity (business)CulpabilityCompensation (psychology)Transparency (behavior)Public consultationDeliberative democracyPreferencePersuasionDiversity (politics)Personal AttributePsychological reviewMessage frameSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)Message framingFairness perceptionsPublic administrationAffect (psychology)Transformational leadershipDemographic economicsResource (project management)HomogeneousHofstede's cultural dimensions theorySocial psychologyCloud computing
12Publications
2H-index
16Citations
Publications 9
Newest
#1Xingbo LiH-Index: 2
#2Shalini Sarin JainH-Index: 2
Last. Shailendra Pratap JainH-Index: 14
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Two studies tested the hypothesis that power affects an individual’s likelihood to be influenced by positively vs. negatively framed comparative messages. Experiment 1 showed that individuals with a higher personal sense of power are more persuaded by positively framed messages than negatively framed messages. Experiment 2 showed that this effect is partly attributable to higher power individuals being more suspicious of the negatively framed communicator’s motivation. Message frame did not have...
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#1Shalini Sarin Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
#2Guy D. Fernando (University at Albany, SUNY)H-Index: 9
Last. Sandhya Bhatia (Indian Institute of Management Udaipur)H-Index: 1
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Abstract This study examines gender equity – representation and compensation in top management – in listed family and non-family firms in the U.S. We integrate diversity, gender, and family firm perspectives, to understand how family firms vary from their non-family peers when making strategic choices about achieving gender parity in executive positions. Our empirical analyses confirm that family firms lag non-family firms in gender representation, suggesting they do not fully harness the potent...
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The initial online publication contained a typesetting mistake. The original article has been corrected.
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#1Shalini Sarin Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
#2Joon Sung Lee (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 7
We seek to understand how third-party observers respond to allegations of sexual transgressions, whether their responses vary and if so why, how they determine perpetrator sanctions, who is more forgiving of them, and what is the psychological mechanism underlying this preference. We draw on one dimension of Hofstede's (Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1991) theory of cultural orientations—power distance belief, and one dimension of Haidt's (Psychological ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Pragya Mathur (Baruch College)H-Index: 7
#2Shalini Sarin Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
Abstract Firms often strive to delight their customers and build strong customer-firm relationships by providing favored benefits to their customers. Drawing from the organizational justice literature, we show that even when customers receive favorable outcomes from distributively fair firm actions, considerations of procedural unfairness may adversely affect their firm evaluations. Procedural fairness salience and customers’ perceived relationship with the firm determine the extent to which pro...
2 CitationsSource
#1Guy D. Fernando (University at Albany, SUNY)H-Index: 9
#2Shalini Sarin Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
Last. Arindam Tripathy (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
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Abstract In this study we explore the mediating role of managerial ability in the relationship between gender diversity and firm performance. Drawing on diversity, gender, and upper echelon theories, we propose that the addition of unique female perspectives and leadership styles will afford gender-diverse TMTs a managerial capability advantage over equally talented yet homogeneous male teams; and this link between gender diversity and managerial capability will be more pronounced in times of cr...
9 CitationsSource
#1Naman Desai (IIMA: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad)H-Index: 5
#2Shailendra Pratap Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
Last. Arindam Tripathy (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
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Abstract Individuals typically believe that a highly valued personal attribute is a non-malleable trait-like entity (entity theory), or that the attribute is malleable and can be changed and developed (incremental theory). Research suggests that entity theorists perceive existing norms, regulations, and moral orders to be more rigid, whereas incremental theorists assess morality in terms of broad principles that shape world views. We argue that these differences in traits would increase incremen...
1 CitationsSource
#1Shalini Sarin Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
#2Shailendra Pratap Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
Abstract Transparency is a significant topic of debate in virtually every domain of human existence today. However, an understanding of conditions when it is preferred and when it is not is ambiguous. In this paper, we show that preference for transparency may be driven by people's power distance belief (PDB; Hofstede, 2001 ). Six studies in different domains—corporate transgressions, job interview settings, and corporate policy—reveal that people low in PDB express greater preference for transp...
12 CitationsSource
#1Shalini Sarin Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
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