Ryann Reynolds-McIlnay
Oregon State University
Human–computer interactionAdvertisingInteractive kioskProduct (category theory)BusinessHaptic technologyMarketingPoint (typography)Downstream (manufacturing)Consumer choiceDistractionQuality (business)PreferenceCredit cardVisual attentionMobile appsAuditory distractionBrightness contrastComputer scienceProcess (engineering)Database transaction
3Publications
2H-index
29Citations
Publications 3
Newest
#1Virginie MailleH-Index: 6
#2Maureen MorrinH-Index: 27
Last. Ryann Reynolds-McIlnayH-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
People like graspable objects more when the objects are located on the dominant-hand side of their body or when the handles point toward their dominant-hand side. However, many products do not have...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ryann Reynolds-McIlnay (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 2
#2Maureen Morrin (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 27
Abstract This research examines the effects of sounds made by retail technological interfaces – self-checkout kiosks, credit card readers, mobile apps, websites – at point-of-sale. We propose that such sounds, retail transaction auditory confirmation (RTAC), increase trust in technological interfaces by providing auditory confirmation that stages of the checkout process have been successfully executed. Increased trust in technological interfaces leads to positive downstream consequences in the f...
4 CitationsSource
#1Ryann Reynolds-McIlnay (OSU: Oregon State University)H-Index: 2
#2Maureen Morrin (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 27
Last. Jens Nordfält (HHS: Stockholm School of Economics)H-Index: 12
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A conceptual model is developed to predict how consumers respond to in-store displays as a function of the extent to which a product’s brightness level (i.e., its perceived light-emitting quality) contrasts with that of its background environment and the product’s level of disarray. We show that products whose brightness levels contrast more with those of the retail environment are more preferred because they visually “pop out” (e.g., a dark product in a brightly lit store environment). However,...
23 CitationsSource