Robert J. Bloch
University of Maryland, Baltimore
AnatomyBiophysicsInternal medicineEndocrinologyCytoskeletonMolecular biologyChemistrySarcolemmaMyocyteMuscular dystrophySkeletal muscleCostameresDysferlinObscurinSpectrinBiochemistrySarcomereAcetylcholine receptorBiologyCell biology
185Publications
56H-index
5,645Citations
Publications 184
Newest
#1Karla P. García-Pelagio (UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)H-Index: 6
#2Robert J. Bloch (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 56
Intermediate filaments, composed primarily by desmin and keratins, link the myofibrils to each other, to intracellular organelles, and to the sarcolemma. There they may play an important role in transfer of contractile force from the Z-disks and M-lines of neighboring myofibrils to costameres at the membrane, across the membrane to the extracellular matrix, and ultimately to the tendon (“lateral force transmission”). We measured the elasticity of the sarcolemma and the connections it makes at co...
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#1Christian J. Kinney (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
#2Robert J. Bloch (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 56
µ-Crystallin is a NADPH-regulated thyroid hormone binding protein encoded by the CRYM gene in humans. It is primarily expressed in the brain, muscle, prostate, and kidney, where it binds thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism and thermogenesis. It also acts as a ketimine reductase in the lysine degradation pathway when it is not bound to thyroid hormone. Mutations in CRYM can result in non-syndromic deafness, while its aberrant expression, predominantly in the brain but also in other tissue...
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#1Valeriy LukyanenkoH-Index: 18
#2Joaquin MurielH-Index: 7
Last. Robert J. BlochH-Index: 56
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#1Christian J. Kinney (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
#2Andrea O'Neill (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 15
Last. Joseph A. Roche (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 15
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Abstract μ-Crystallin, encoded by the CRYM gene, binds the thyroid hormones, T3 and T4. Because T3 and T4 are potent regulators of metabolism and gene expression, and CRYM levels in human skeletal muscle can vary widely, we investigated the effects of overexpression of Crym. We generated transgenic mice, Crym tg, that expressed Crym protein specifically in skeletal muscle at levels 2.6–147.5 fold higher than in controls. Muscular functions, Ca2+ transients, contractile force, fatigue, running on...
1 CitationsSource
#1Michael Kyba (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 63
#2Robert J. Bloch (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 56
Last. Yi-Wen Chen (GW: George Washington University)H-Index: 27
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2 CitationsSource
#1Amber L. Mueller (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 7
#2Robert J. Bloch (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 56
Xenografts of skeletal muscle are used to study muscle repair and regeneration, mechanisms of muscular dystrophies, and potential cell therapies for musculoskeletal disorders. Typically, xenografting involves using an immunodeficient host that is pre-injured to create a niche for human cell engraftment. Cell type and method of delivery to muscle depend on the specific application, but can include myoblasts, satellite cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, mesangioblasts, immortalized muscle prec...
10 CitationsSource
#1Valeriy LukyanenkoH-Index: 18
#2Joaquin MurielH-Index: 7
Last. Robert J. BlochH-Index: 56
view all 3 authors...
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#1Joaquin Muriel (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 7
#2Andrea O'Neill (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 15
Last. Robert J. Bloch (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 56
view all 6 authors...
Intermediate filaments (IFs) contribute to force transmission, cellular integrity and signaling in skeletal muscle. We previously identified keratin 19 (Krt19) as muscle IF protein. We now report t...
4 CitationsSource
#1Amber L. Mueller (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 7
#2Andrea O'Neill (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 15
Last. Robert J. Bloch (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 56
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Abstract Aberrant expression of DUX4, a gene unique to humans and primates, causes Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy-1 (FSHD), yet the pathogenic mechanism is unknown. As transgenic overexpression models have largely failed to replicate the genetic changes seen in FSHD, many studies of endogenously expressed DUX4 have been limited to patient biopsies and myogenic cell cultures, which never fully differentiate into mature muscle fibers. We have developed a method to xenograft immortalized hu...
15 CitationsSource
#2Atum M. BuoH-Index: 9
Last. Robert J. BlochH-Index: 56
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Intermediate filaments (IFs) represent a major cytoskeletal network contributing to force transmission, cell shape and structure, adhesion and motility, subcellular scaffolding and tissue resilience, thereby modulating a range of cellular activities. Life-threatening disorders associated with IF mutations have pushed investigations to study IFs of mammalian cells in culture and in vivo. Keratin and Lamin related disorders, Desmin-related myopathy, Muscular Dystrophies, Alexander disease are just...
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