Shailendra Pratap Jain
University of Washington
MalleabilityAdvertisingComparative advertisingFrame (networking)Product (category theory)Consumption (economics)BusinessPsychologyActuarial scienceEconomicsMarketingCognitionMicroeconomicsCognitive psychologyRegulatory focus theoryPerspective (graphical)PerceptionValue (mathematics)Context (language use)PreferencePersuasionMessage frameSelf construalMessage framingCuriosityAffect (psychology)Social psychologyInformation processingCategorization
55Publications
14H-index
730Citations
Publications 51
Newest
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 5
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 14
Last. Charles D. Lindsey (UB: University at Buffalo)H-Index: 7
view all 3 authors...
Firms routinely offer warranties, often as attempts to differentiate their offerings from those of competitors. Despite this practice common to virtually every consumer durable category, extant research has been inconclusive regarding the effect of warranties on quality judgments. One potential limitation of these prior investigations is the failure to model a key element of a product warranty—consumer-side transaction costs associated with warranty redemption. In this article, we introduce the ...
9 CitationsSource
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 5
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 14
Last. Durairaj MaheswaranH-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
We examined the consequences of regulatory focus on exposure to two types of comparative advertising frames-a maximal claim ("brand A is superior to brand B") and a minimal claim ("brand A is equivalent or similar to brand B")-in three experiments. In experiment 1, we manipulated these frames, basing the sponsor brand's claim on comparison with an existing brand. In experiment 2, we operationalized the frames using a comparison featuring a sponsor brand targeting an established standard (Food an...
66 CitationsSource
#1Steven S. Posavac (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 27
#2J. Joško Brakus (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 12
Last. Maria L. Cronley (Miami University)H-Index: 14
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The need to determine the value of environmental entities has generated substantial research regarding optimal methods for obtaining valuations from survey respondents. The literature suggests the importance of providing clear, complete descriptions of the entity being valued prior to respondents indicating their valuations. The target entity’s attributes are often presented in isolation or in greater detail compared with other entities. Two experiments were conducted to explore whether selectiv...
15 CitationsSource
#1Steven S. Posavac (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 27
#2Shailendra Pratap Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
Last. Maria L. Cronley (Miami University)H-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
The need to determine the value of environmental entities has generated substantial research regarding optimal methods for obtaining valuations from survey respondents. The literature suggests the importance of providing clear, complete descriptions of the entity being valued prior to respondents indicating their valuations. The target entity’s attributes are often presented in isolation or in greater detail compared with other entities. Two experiments were conducted to explore whether selectiv...
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (IU: Indiana University Bloomington)H-Index: 5
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 14
Recent research in motivated reasoning has examined processing of information that is consistent or inconsistent with one's preferences. This paper extends the work by examining the micro-processes of the processing of such information. In addition, it examines the moderating impact of preference strength and argument quality on processing of and judgments associated with preference-consistent and preference-inconsistent information. Across 2 studies, evidence was obtained suggesting that prefer...
13 CitationsSource
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (SPbU: Saint Petersburg State University)H-Index: 1
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (SPbU: Saint Petersburg State University)H-Index: 14
Last. Steven S. Posavac (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 27
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Recent research has found that search and experience attribute claims are processed differently by consumers, with search attribute claims typically being more believable than experience attribute claims. It is, however, routinely the case that marketers desire to promote a product by making a claim featuring an experience attribute. The marketing literature has largely neglected the issue of how to enhance persuasion of experience attribute claims. The purpose of this research was to fill this ...
104 CitationsSource
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 14
#2Durairaj Maheswaran (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 30
We show how motivation affects reasoning through reliance on a biased set of cognitive processes. We manipulate the level of brand preference experimentally and expose subjects to a message that is either consistent or inconsistent with their manipulated preference. Further, the message contains either strong or weak arguments. In two experiments, we find that preference-inconsistent information is processed more systematically and is counter argued more than preference-consistent information. I...
151 CitationsSource
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 1
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 14
Last. Durairaj Maheswaran (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
We employed an attributional framework to test the differences between comparative and noncomparative ads when different attribute types were featured. Our experimental findings suggest that noncomparative ads might be more believable than comparative ads for experience attribute claims; however, for search attribute claims, the 2 might elicit similar levels of believability. We also find some support for the attributional underpinnings of lower believability associated with comparative-experien...
30 CitationsSource
#1Shailendra Pratap Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
#2Steven S. Posavac (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 27
Recent research has found that search and experience attribute claims are processed differently by consumers, with search attribute claims typically being more believable than experience attribute claims. It is, however, routinely the case that marketers desire to promote a product by making a claim featuring an experience attribute. The marketing literature has largely neglected the issue of how to enhance persuasion of experience attribute claims. The purpose of this research was to fill this ...
1 CitationsSource