Mariana E. Bradshaw
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Quality of lifeCancerInternal medicineNeuropsychologyOncologyCognitionNeurocognitiveSystemic therapyAdverse effectNeuroprotectionBrain metastasisQuality of life (healthcare)RadiosurgeryIntervention (counseling)MoodTemporal lobePopulationVerbal learningRadiation therapyNeuropsychological assessmentCognitive testClinical psychologyMedicine
10Publications
4H-index
52Citations
Publications 9
Newest
#1Karine A. Al Feghali (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 5
#2Caroline Chung (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 10
Last. Mariana E. Bradshaw (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 4
view all 4 authors...
Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors, with an incidence rate ranging from 7 to 14 per 100,000. Both the disease process itself and its treatments can be associated with debilitating and life-altering neurocognitive adverse effects. The treatment of brain metastases involves a multidisciplinary team that aims to maximize the benefits and minimize the toxicities of treatment, which may include surgical resection, radiation therapy (stereotactic radiosurgery or whole-brain radia...
Source
#1Karine A. Al Feghali (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 5
#2Mariana E. Bradshaw (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 4
Last. Jeffrey S. Wefel (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors, occurring in more than 15% of cancer patients. The treatment of brain metastases involves a multidisciplinary approach that may consist of surgery, radiation therapy (stereotactic radiosurgery or whole-brain radiation therapy), and/or systemic therapy. Unfortunately, all these treatment strategies, as well as the disease process itself, can be associated with debilitating and life-altering neurocognitive adverse effects. Balancing the ben...
Source
#1Eduardo EstevisH-Index: 3
#2Kyle R. Noll (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 11
Last. Jeffrey S. Wefel (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Background: Operating a motor vehicle involves multiple cognitive and sensorimotor faculties. Neurological conditions pose driving risk, but this has not been examined in patients with primary brain tumors. Methods: Sixty-four patients with primary brain tumors (32 left hemisphere; 69% glioblastoma) completed the Cognitive Behavioral Driver's Inventory (CBDI). A subset also completed broader cognitive testing. Patient characteristics, CBDI measures, and broader neuropsychological test scores wer...
Source
#1Kyle R. Noll (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 11
#2Mariana E. Bradshaw (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 4
Last. Jeffrey S. Wefel (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 31
view all 6 authors...
Purpose of review A detailed characterization of the nature of neurocognitive impairment in patients with brain tumors is provided, as well as considerations for clinical practice regarding neuropsychological assessment throughout the disease course.
Source
#1Kyle R. Noll (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 11
#2Mariana E. Bradshaw (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 4
Last. Jeffrey S. Wefel (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Background: Cancer and treatment-related neurocognitive dysfunction has the potential to significantly disrupt the lives of survivors. While neurocognitive functioning is known to predict aspects of patient-reported quality of life in individuals with glioma, little is known regarding the association between neurocognitive functioning and clinician-rated functional independence. Methods: Newly diagnosed patients with glioma in the left (n = 73; 49% glioblastoma) or right (n = 30; 57% glioblastom...
Source
#1Kyle R. Noll (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 11
#2Mariana E. Bradshaw (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 4
Last. Jeffrey S. Wefel (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
: Oncology has experienced positive shifts in survival curves for many cancers largely due to the development of earlier diagnostics and better therapeutics. This has increased the visibility and need for survivorship services, including clinical neuropsychology. Patients with cancer frequently experience cognitive dysfunction related to the presence of cancer itself and treatment neurotoxicity. These cognitive difficulties can profoundly impact patient functioning and autonomy with accompanying...
Source
#1Kyle R. Noll (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 11
#2Mariana E. Bradshaw (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 4
Last. Jeffrey S. Wefel (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Objective While neurocognitive functioning (NCF) and mood disturbance share a relationship with health-related quality of life (HRQOL), few studies have examined relationships between these constructs in glioma patients prior to treatment. Methods Newly diagnosed patients with glioma in the left (N = 73; 49% glioblastoma) or right (N = 30; 57% glioblastoma) temporal lobe completed neuropsychological testing and self-report measures of HRQOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-General...
Source
#1Jeffrey S. WefelH-Index: 31
Last. Terri S. ArmstrongH-Index: 34
view all 5 authors...
BACKGROUND: BT survivors commonly have impairments in attention/memory that adversely impact independence, home, school and work roles, mood and quality of life. Adults produce new brain cells, replace dead brain cells, and adaptively recruit new brain regions to perform certain tasks. We sought to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and early efficacy signals of an at-home, internet accessible, adaptive, brain-plasticity based computerized intervention designed to enhance attention/memory...
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#2Jeffrey S. WefelH-Index: 31
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