Ariel E. Lugo
United States Forest Service
Environmental resource managementEcosystemBiomass (ecology)BiodiversitySecondary forestNutrientEcological successionVegetationIntroduced speciesEcologyGeographyExperimental forestEnvironmental scienceTropicsSpecies richnessAgroforestryAgronomyMangroveBiologyBasal areaForestry
255Publications
84H-index
23.6kCitations
Publications 327
Newest
#1Elani B. Elizondo (BU: Boston University)
#2Joanna C. Carey (Babson College)H-Index: 15
Last. Robinson W. Fulweiler (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 28
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Over the last two decades, recognition of the important role terrestrial plants play in regulating silicon (Si) cycling has emerged. Si improves plant fitness by protecting them from abiotic (e.g., dessication) and biotic (e.g., fungal attack) stressors. Once incorporated into plant biomass this biogenic Si is more bio-available than the lithogenic material from which it was ultimately derived. Thus plants play a key function in regulating the amount and timing of Si availability in downstream e...
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#1Jess K. Zimmerman (UPR-RP: University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras)H-Index: 59
#2Tana E. Wood (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 18
Last. Ariel E. Lugo (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 84
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Abstract The Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) has a long history of research on tropical forestry, ecology, and conservation, dating as far back as the early 19th Century. Scientific surveys conducted by early explorers of Puerto Rico, followed by United States institutions contributed early understanding of biogeography, species endemism, and tropical soil characteristics. Research in the second half of the 1900s established the LEF as an exemplar of forest management and restoration research...
1 CitationsSource
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#1Albert E. MayfieldH-Index: 21
Last. Ariel E. LugoH-Index: 84
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Wide climatic variations characterize the Southeastern United States (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia) and Caribbean (Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands) region, including tropical, subtropical, warm-temperate, and temperate environments, as well as diverse ecosystems from coastal wetlands and dunes to piedmont savannahs and montane forests (Fig. A8.1). More than 85% of the forest l...
#1Robert L. Spicer (Rowan University)
#2Ariel E. Lugo (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 84
Last. Nathan Ruhl (Rowan University)H-Index: 7
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Categorization of topographical features into landform type is a long-standing method for understanding physiographic patterns in the environment. Differences in forest composition between landform types are driven primarily by concurrent differences in soil composition and moisture, but also disturbance regime. Many studies have focused on the interaction between fire disturbance, succession, and landforms, but the effects of hurricane disturbance on compositional differences between landforms ...
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#1Ariel E. Lugo (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 84
Ecologists addressed the effects of disturbances from the onset of the field by focusing on ecesis, which is the process by which organisms migrate and establish under the environmental conditions created by disturbances. Ecesis is the onset of succession, a self-organizing process whose nature, speed, and outcome depend in part on the outcomes of ecesis and the residual legacies remaining after disturbances. A by-product of succession after a disturbance is the reorganization of species dominan...
5 CitationsSource
#1Ariel E. Lugo (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 84
#2Oscar J. Abelleira Martínez (RUM: University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez)H-Index: 1
Last. Tamara Heartsill Scalley (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 4
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Abstract We review literature relevant to assessing the future of tropical forests and supplement the review with new data from the lowlands of Venezuela. Compared to today, future tropical forests will have a higher level of novelty, defined as the degree of dissimilarity of a system relative to a historical baseline. Processes of succession and evolution generate novelty in forests and have done so for millennia. Under increasing human activity and climate change, the rate of generation of nov...
1 CitationsSource
The United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service International Institute of Tropical Forestry (the Institute) celebrates its 75th Anniversary with the publication of this Special Issue of Forests. This Issue is based on presentations delivered in a symposium held in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 2014. It augments a quarter century of scientific knowledge and capitalizes on a unique set of synergies chartered by a strategy based on shared stewardship, innovative transdisciplinary collaborati...
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#1Michael R. Willig (UConn: University of Connecticut)H-Index: 74
#2Lawrence L. Woolbright (Siena College)H-Index: 12
Last. Ariel E. Lugo (USDA: United States Department of Agriculture)H-Index: 84
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In PNAS, Lister and Garcia (1) report declines in abundances of understory arthropods and lizards between 1976 and 2012 and claim similar declines in populations of arthropods, frogs, and insectivorous birds based on data from the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research project (LUQ). Their conclusion, that increasing temperature has led to a collapse of the food web, has attracted considerable attention from public media, but this conclusion is not corroborated by empirical evidence from LUQ (se...
32 CitationsSource
#1Ariel E. Lugo (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 84
In the online and printed version of this article a few lines of text and a figure are incorrect. The corrected text and figure are given below
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