Isabelle Boudry
DNA repairPathologyDNA damageMolecular biologyMacrophage inflammatory proteinTumor necrosis factor alphaChemistryOxidative stressLewisiteInflammationGuanineGenotoxicityErythemaHairlessAntidoteWound healingSulfur mustardDNA AlkylationToxicityPoison controlNecrosisDNABiochemistryMedicineTransepidermal water lossPharmacology
11Publications
9H-index
162Citations
Publications 11
Newest
#1Sylvie SauvaigoH-Index: 25
#2Fanny SarrazyH-Index: 3
Last. Thierry DoukiH-Index: 78
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that, upon topical application, damages skin and reaches internal organs through diffusion in blood. Two major toxic consequences of SM exposure are inflammation, associated with oxidative stress, and the formation of alkylated DNA bases. In the present study, we investigated the impact of exposure to SM on DNA repair, using two different functional DNA repair assays which provide information on several Base Excision Repair (BER) and Excis...
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#1Mohamed BatalH-Index: 5
Last. Thierry DoukiH-Index: 78
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Sulfur mustard (SM) is an old chemical warfare but it remains a threat to both militaries and civilians. SM mainly targets skin, eyes and lungs and diffuses to internal organs. At the molecular level, SM is able to damage DNA through the formation of monoadducts and biadduct. Glutathione (GSH) is another critical target of SM in cells since it is part of the detoxification mechanism against alkylating agents. In the present work, we investigated whether SM could form covalent bonds simu...
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#1Stéphane MouretH-Index: 15
#2Julien WartelleH-Index: 5
Last. Isabelle BoudryH-Index: 9
view all 11 authors...
Sulfur mustard (SM) is a strong bifunctional alkylating agent that produces severe tissue injuries characterized by erythema, edema, subepidermal blisters and a delayed inflammatory response after cutaneous exposure. However, despite its long history, SM remains a threat because of the lack of effective medical countermeasures as the molecular mechanisms of these events remain unclear. This limited number of therapeutic options results in part of an absence of appropriate animal models. We propo...
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#1Mohamed Batal (UJF: Joseph Fourier University)H-Index: 5
#2Isabelle BoudryH-Index: 9
Last. Thierry Douki (UJF: Joseph Fourier University)H-Index: 78
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the f...
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Data on the toxicity of lewisite (L), a vesicant chemical warfare agent, are scarce and conflicting, and the use of the specific antidote is not without drawbacks. This study was designed to evaluate if the SKH-1 hairless mouse model was suitable to study the L-induced skin injuries. We studied the progression of lesions following exposure to L vapors for 21 days using paraclinical parameters (color, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and biomechanical measurements), histological assessments, and...
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#1Mohamed Batal (UJF: Joseph Fourier University)H-Index: 5
#2Isabelle BoudryH-Index: 9
Last. Thierry Douki (UJF: Joseph Fourier University)H-Index: 78
view all 9 authors...
Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after ...
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Abstract Lewisite is a potent chemical warfare arsenical vesicant that can cause severe skin lesions. Today, lewisite exposure remains possible during demilitarization of old ammunitions and as a result of deliberate use. Although its cutaneous toxicity is not fully elucidated, a specific antidote exists, the British anti-lewisite (BAL, dimercaprol) but it is not without untoward effects. Analogs of BAL, less toxic, have been developed such as meso -2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and have be...
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BACKGROUND: To date, sulphur mustard (SM) cutaneous toxicity has been commonly assessed on account of several animal models such as pigs and weanling pigs. Few experiments however, have been carried out on mice so far. In this study, we aimed at quantifying spontaneous wound healing processes after SM exposure on a SKH-1 mouse model through non-invasive methods over an extended period of time. METHODS: Animals were exposed to 10 μL net SM in a vapor cup system. Measurements of barrier function (...
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#1Mohamed Batal (UJF: Joseph Fourier University)H-Index: 5
#2Isabelle BoudryH-Index: 9
Last. Thierry Douki (UJF: Joseph Fourier University)H-Index: 78
view all 5 authors...
Sulphur mustard (SM) is known as an efficient vesicating agent as well as a carcinogenic chemical. This warfare agent remains a threat for both civilians and militaries. DNA alkylation is one of the critical molecular pathways at the origin of the symptoms associated with SM exposure. SM forms monoadducts with guanine and adenine as well as a biadduct between two guanine bases. The aim of the present work is to determine the relative yields of these three lesions in DNA samples after SM exposure...
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#1Virginie ValletH-Index: 1
#2T. Poyot (AG: Analysis Group)H-Index: 1
Last. Isabelle BoudryH-Index: 9
view all 7 authors...
Sulfur mustard (HD) ranks among the alkylating chemical warfare agents. Skin contact with HD produces an inflammatory response that evolves into separation at the epidermal–dermal junction conducting to blistering and epidermis necrosis. Up to now, current treatment strategies of HD burns have solely consisted in symptomatic management of skin damage. Therapeutic efficacy studies are still being conducted; classically using appropriate animal skin toxicity models. In order to substantiate the us...
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