Jennifer Aaker
Stanford University
Competence (human resources)AdvertisingFeelingProduct (category theory)PsychologyEconomicsMarketingSelfCognitive psychologyInterdependencePersonalityRegulatory focus theoryConsumer behaviourPerceptionAppealHappinessMeaning (existential)PersuasionAffect (psychology)Promotion (rank)Social psychology
174Publications
48H-index
15.1kCitations
Publications 100
Newest
#1Melanie Rudd (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 6
#2Rhia Catapano (Stanford University)H-Index: 5
Last. Jennifer Aaker (Stanford University)H-Index: 48
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In this conceptual paper, we review three decades of research on time and meaning in consumer research and psychology to identify key themes that have emerged, build frameworks that integrate past research, and reveal areas of potential for future empirical exploration. We begin by carving out a conceptual understanding of meaning in life and identifying time as a key lens through which the pursuit of meaning can be viewed. We then review extant research on how to spend and construe time in ways...
6 CitationsSource
#1Szu-chi Huang (Stanford University)H-Index: 10
#2Jennifer Aaker (Stanford University)H-Index: 48
People pursue goals throughout their lives, and many of these attempts end happily—a goal is achieved. However, what facilitates the continuation of behaviors that are aligned with the completed goal, such as continuing to monitor food intake after completing a diet program? The results of 6 studies involving over 1,600 people across cultures and samples (executives in Africa, dieters in a 7-day food diary program, exercisers in a 14-day walking program, and college students) demonstrated that c...
4 CitationsSource
#1Kathleen D. Vohs (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 91
#2Jennifer Aaker (Stanford University)H-Index: 48
Last. Rhia Catapano (Stanford University)H-Index: 5
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People seek to spend time in positive experiences, enjoying and savoring. Yet there is no escaping negative experiences, from the mundane (e.g. arguing) to the massive (e.g. death of a child). Might negative experiences confer a hidden benefit to well-being? We propose that they do, in the form of enhanced meaning in life. Research suggests that negative experiences can serve to boost meaning because they stimulate comprehension (understanding how the event fits into a broader narrative of the s...
8 CitationsSource
#1Rhia CatapanoH-Index: 5
#2Jordi QuoidbachH-Index: 1
Last. Jennifer AakerH-Index: 48
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1 Citations
#1Cassie Mogilner (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 18
#2Hal E. Hershfield (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 19
Last. Jennifer Aaker (Stanford University)H-Index: 48
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11 CitationsSource
#1Donnel A. Briley (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 13
#2Melanie Rudd (UH: University of Houston)H-Index: 6
Last. Jennifer Aaker (Stanford University)H-Index: 48
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Research shows that optimism can positively impact health, but when and why people feel optimistic when confronting health challenges is less clear. Findings from six studies show that the frames people adopt when thinking about health challenges influence their optimism about overcoming those challenges, and that their culture moderates this effect. In cultures where the independent self is highly accessible, individuals adopting an initiator frame (how will I act, regardless of the situations ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Hal E. HershfieldH-Index: 19
#2Cassie MogilnerH-Index: 18
Last. Jennifer AakerH-Index: 48
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#1Rhia CatapanoH-Index: 5
#2David J. HardistyH-Index: 14
Last. Jennifer AakerH-Index: 48
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