Katherine M. Keyes
Columbia University
EpidemiologyPsychiatryMental healthPublic healthDemographyOdds ratioPsychologyOccupational safety and healthInjury preventionCohort effectYoung adultDepression (differential diagnoses)PopulationPoison controlSubstance abuseSuicide preventionAnxietyClinical psychologyMedicineEnvironmental health
400Publications
85H-index
16.6kCitations
Publications 398
Newest
#1Rachel Sayko Adams (Brandeis University)H-Index: 13
#2Emily Ledingham (Brandeis University)
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
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#1Joseph J. Palamar (Columbia University)
#2Caroline Rutherford (Columbia University)H-Index: 7
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
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Objectives. To determine whether there have been shifts in nonmedical ketamine use, poisonings (“exposures”), and seizures. Methods. We used generalized additive models to detect trends in past-yea...
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#1Lucinda Rachel Grummitt (National Health and Medical Research Council)
#2Noah Kreski (Columbia University)
Last. Katie A. McLaughlin (Harvard University)H-Index: 93
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Importance null Childhood adversity (CA) is a powerful determinant of long-term physical and mental health that is associated with elevated risk for chronic disease and psychopathology. However, the degree to which CA contributes to mortality as a preventable driver of ill-health and death is unknown. null Objective null To estimate the contribution of CA to health behaviors, including smoking and sedentary behavior, as well as the annual mortality attributable to CA in the US through influences...
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#1Sarah McKetta (Columbia University)H-Index: 6
#2Seth J. Prins (Columbia University)H-Index: 12
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
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Abstract null null Background null Rates of binge drinking have nearly doubled among US women ages 30-49 since 2006. Employment influences alcohol use and varies by the prestige and structure (e.g., authority, autonomy, expertise) of one's occupation. null null null Methods null We examined trends in binge drinking among adults ages 30-49 in the labor force in 2006-2018 National Health Interview Surveys (N=108,981) by occupation, work prestige (General Social Survey's occupational prestige score...
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#1John R. Pamplin (Columbia University)H-Index: 2
#2Katrina Kezios (Columbia University)H-Index: 6
Last. Lisa M. Bates (Columbia University)H-Index: 25
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#1Justin Jager (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 19
#2Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
Last. John E. Schulenberg (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 114
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Abstract null null Aims null To present national trends by age and cohort among middle-aged adults in the prevalence of AUD symptomology, by severity, sex, race, and education null null null Design null National, multi-cohort longitudinal probability samples of US adults, with data collected at ages 35, 40, and 45 among 14 cohorts who reached age 45 between 2003 and 2016. null null null Setting null Data were collected via self-administered questionnaires to adults in the United States. null nul...
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#1Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
#2Jonathan Platt (Columbia University)H-Index: 13
Last. Justin Jager (ASU: Arizona State University)H-Index: 19
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Gender differences in binge drinking have converged in recent cohorts, due in part to faster decreases in consumption among boys in adolescence, and faster increases in consumption among women in young to middle adulthood. Changes in education and occupation explain a portion, but not all, of these differences; the present study examines how attitudes about gender, religion and family additionally explain cohort effects in binge drinking by sex. Data were drawn from the Monitoring the Future pan...
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#1Richard A. Miech (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 58
#2Megan E. Patrick (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 58
Last. Lloyd D. Johnston (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 118
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BACKGROUND: How adolescent substance use and perceived availability of substances have changed during the COVID-19 pandemic remain largely unknown. Substantial reduction in availability of substances would present a unique opportunity to consider the supply-side hypothesis that reductions in drug availability will lead to reductions in drug prevalence. METHODS: Longitudinal data come from Monitoring the Future and are based on responses from 582 adolescents who were originally surveyed as part o...
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#1Noah Kreski (Columbia University)
#2Qixuan Chen (Columbia University)H-Index: 23
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
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Over the past decade, US adolescents' depressive symptoms have increased, and changing religious beliefs and service attendance may be contributing factors. We examined the contribution of religious factors to depressive symptoms among 417,540 US adolescents (grades: 8, 10, 12), years:1991-2019, in survey-weighted logistic regressions. Among adolescents who felt religion was personally important, those who never attended services had 2.23 times higher odds of reporting depressive symptoms compar...
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#1Gonzalo Martínez-Alés (Hospital Universitario La Paz)H-Index: 6
#2Catherine Gimbrone (Columbia University)H-Index: 1
Last. Katherine M. Keyes (Columbia University)H-Index: 85
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Introduction null In the U.S., state-level household firearm ownership is strongly associated with firearm suicide mortality rates. Whether the recent increases in firearm suicide are explained by state-level household firearm ownership rates and trends remains unknown. null null null Methods null Mortality data from the U.S. National Vital Statistics System and an estimate of state-level household firearm ownership rate were used to conduct hierarchical age–period–cohort (random-effects) modeli...
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