Kathleen C. Burns
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay
MalleabilityPrejudice (legal term)Valence (psychology)FeelingSocial perceptionSocial relationSocial influenceDevelopmental psychologyEvidence-based practiceEmotional expressionSocial psychology (sociology)Mathematics educationTeaching and learning centerPsychologyStereotype (UML)CognitionSchema (psychology)SelfHeterosexualityWork (electrical)Political scienceImpression formationCognitive psychologyPrime (order theory)Cognitive biasSchematicVigilance (psychology)PedagogyStandardized testClass (computer programming)Order (business)HomosexualityRepetition (rhetorical device)Information seekingControl (linguistics)PatriotismStereotype threatImplicit theories of intelligenceDisgustSelf-conceptIdentity (social science)StereotypeGirlCrutchLearning environmentTest (assessment)Scholarship of Teaching and LearningDimension (data warehouse)AngerSadnessMoodVideo equipmentNegative correlationDirect evaluationMathematical abilityAffective primingHealth benefitsIntroductory psychologyMulti siteSelf-controlPrejudiceEducational researchAffect (psychology)Priming (psychology)Resource (project management)AnxietyFunction (engineering)Social psychologySocial cognitionInformation processingEmotional exhaustionTeaching methodModerationLearning sciences
15Publications
7H-index
332Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#1Kathleen C. BurnsH-Index: 7
#2Regan A. R. GurungH-Index: 26
Source
#1Regan A. R. Gurung (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 26
#2Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
5 CitationsSource
#1Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
This study investigated whether students use crib cards as a security blanket or a crutch by asking students to tally the number of times they used them during exams in a statistics class. There wa...
5 CitationsSource
#1Linda M. Isbell (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 16
#2Joseph McCabe (Hofstra University)H-Index: 1
Last. Elicia C. Lair (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 8
view all 4 authors...
Two experiments investigated the impact of affect on the working self-concept. Following an affect induction, participants completed the Twenty Statements Test (TST) to assess their working self-concepts. Participants in predominantly happy and angry states used more abstract statements to describe themselves than did participants in predominantly sad and fearful states. Evaluations of the statements that participants generated (Experiment 2) demonstrate that these effects are not the result of ...
14 CitationsSource
#1Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
#2Stacy L. Friedman (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)H-Index: 1
This study investigated the effects of emotional expression on actual and perceived math performance. Female participants were either asked to express their emotions or given no special instructions before taking a math test under stereotype threat or no stereotype threat conditions. Participants in the emotional expression condition performed better on the math test than participants in the control condition. Under stereotype threat, participants in the emotional expression condition believed t...
3 CitationsSource
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
Last. Heather N. Fedesco (Purdue University)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
Results from two experiments demonstrated that people's pre-emptive self-presentations increased when faced with an upcoming evaluation. However, like compensatory self-presentations, these efforts were cautiously restricted to areas unrelated to the forthcoming evaluative dimension. The contributions to the literature are straightforward with the results building on and extending prior work. First, where previous research shows that people engage in self-presentations to compensate for an alrea...
1 CitationsSource
#1Regan A. R. Gurung (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 26
#2Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
Psychology instructors are lucky people. Social psychologists are particularly lucky. Psychology in general is fun to teach, but social psychology truly takes it upmany notches. Social psychology is the study of howwe are influenced by other people and the situations we find ourselves in. Is there a more relevant area to help study how teachers and the learning environment can influence learning? Some introductory instructors often move the social psychology section to early in the semester to g...
1 CitationsSource
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
Three experiments investigated people's motivation to conserve the self's limited regulatory resource after it is depleted by initial self-control exertion. Across the experiments, the results supported the idea of a conservation process. In Experiment 1, depleted participants' subsequent performance decreased when expecting to engage in a future self-regulation task compared to engaging in no task at all. In Experiments 2 and 3 we employed the “end-effect” pattern found in past vigilance resear...
37 CitationsSource
#1Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
#2Linda M. Isbell (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 16
Last. James M. TylerH-Index: 11
view all 3 authors...
This paper explores the effects of emotional suppression toward a stereotyped target as a function of the perceivers' prejudice. Heterosexual male participants watched a video of a gay couple with emotional suppression instructions or no instructions. Similar to the emotional regulation literature, low prejudice participants reported less positive emotion under emotional suppression compared to the control group. However, high prejudice participants reported more positive emotion under emotional...
13 CitationsSource
#1James M. Tyler (Purdue University)H-Index: 11
#2Kathleen C. Burns (UWGB: University of Wisconsin–Green Bay)H-Index: 7
Two experiments investigated how people replenish the self's limited regulatory resource after it is depleted by self-control exertion. Specifically, in Experiment 1, when depleted participants received a 10-minute period between regulatory tasks, their subsequent performance equaled non-depleted participants. In Experiment 2, inducing participants to relax between self-regulation tasks reduced the typical depletion effects. Thus, these findings suggest that replenishment of the self's depleted ...
158 CitationsSource