Peggy J. Liu
University of Pittsburgh
Behavioral economicsAdvertisingProduct (category theory)Consumption (economics)BusinessPsychologyEconomicsMarketingChoice setSelfMicroeconomicsCognitive psychologyFood choicePerceptionPsychological interventionQuality (business)ClosenessPreferenceNutrition LabelingPortion sizeCalorieObesityMedicineSocial psychologyEnvironmental health
57Publications
13H-index
788Citations
Publications 53
Newest
#1Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
#2Theresa A. Kwon (University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract null null We present a three-dimensional what, how long, and how often framework to discuss three main inferences about other people’s preferences for repeated social interactions over time: (1) what to do together, (2) how long to spend together on each occasion, and (3) how often to spend time together. For each dimension, we discuss when and how people make inferences about other people’s preferences, as well as the consequences of making incorrect inferences. The three dimensions ar...
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Many consumers engage in frequent consumption indulgences. Because such indulgences accumulate resource costs (e.g., money, calories), consumers are often prompted or need to cut back, posing quest...
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#1Soo Kim (Cornell University)H-Index: 6
#2Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
Last. Kate E. Min (Cornell University)H-Index: 4
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People seek and receive support from friends through self-disclosure. However, when self-disclosures reveal personal insecurities, do people rely on friends as an audience as they normally do? This research demonstrates that they do not. Five preregistered studies show that disclosers exhibit a weaker preference for friends as an audience when disclosures involve revealing personal insecurities than when they involve revealing other neutral or negative personal information. This effect is observ...
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#1Kaitlin Woolley (Cornell University)H-Index: 8
#2Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
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#1Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
#2Ernest Baskin (""St. Joe's"": Saint Joseph's University)H-Index: 11
The trade-off between quality and quantity pervades many domains of life, including that of making product choices for ourselves and others, whether as gifts or as everyday favors. In five studies ...
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#1Ernest Baskin (""St. Joe's"": Saint Joseph's University)H-Index: 11
#2Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
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This research introduces a framework wherein consumers take on “requestor” or “responder” roles in making joint consumption decisions. The authors document a robust preference expression asymmetry ...
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The marketplace includes many attractive high-calorie indulgent food offerings. Despite their appeal, consumers may often be prompted to consider lower-calorie-package offerings instead (e.g., 100-...
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#1Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
#2Cait Lamberton (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 19
Last. Kelly L. Haws (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 25
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#1Kelly L. Haws (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 25
#2Peggy J. Liu (University of Pittsburgh)H-Index: 13
Last. Christina A. Roberto (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 40
view all 5 authors...
Overconsumption of sugary drinks is linked with obesity. These beverages have been the target of recent public health policies, and, simultaneously, some firms have altered their pricing of such beverages, including charging the same price for all beverage sizes (“any-size-same-price” pricing). We compare the effect of any-size-same-price pricing versus standard pricing on soft drink beverage size choices and further, explore the effect of this firm lever under different health-related policy si...
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