Rachelle Buchbinder
Monash University
Internal medicineSurgeryHealth careRandomized controlled trialPhysical therapySystematic reviewAdverse effectRheumatologyAlternative medicinePlaceboPsychological interventionBack painRheumatoid arthritisMEDLINELow back painPopulationFamily medicineClinical trialMedicinePhysical medicine and rehabilitation
662Publications
123H-index
81.7kCitations
Publications 669
Newest
#1Louise WilesH-Index: 14
#2Peter HibbertH-Index: 24
Last. William B. RuncimanH-Index: 64
view all 23 authors...
Study design null Multiround wiki-based Delphi expert panel survey. null Objective null To provide proof of concept for an alternative method for creating sets of nationally-agreed point-of-care clinical indicators, and obtain consensus among end-user groups on "appropriate care" for the assessment, diagnosis, acute, and ongoing care of people with low back pain (LBP). null Summary of background data null The provision of inappropriate and low value care for LBP is a significant healthcare and s...
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#1Vanessa Glennon (Monash University)
#2Samuel L. Whittle (Monash University)H-Index: 1
Last. Rachelle Buchbinder (Monash University)H-Index: 123
view all 10 authors...
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#1Ian A. Harris (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 53
#2Rachelle Buchbinder (Monash University)H-Index: 123
There are many respects in which the modern medical system is not fit for purpose and poses a threat to human health. In so many situations, our superficial assumptions about medicine are wrong. Having more tests to identify disease is often not better than leaving those “well enough” alone, labelling people with a specific disease may not be helpful, and more medicine may not be better than less medicine or no medicine at all.1 In our eagerness to intervene, we can end up doing harm. This fits ...
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#1Michael Di Donato (Monash University)H-Index: 2
#2Ting XiaH-Index: 6
Last. Alex CollieH-Index: 51
view all 5 authors...
This study aimed to identify patterns of opioid dispensing in Australian workers with low back pain (LBP) and determine the association of dispensing patterns with wage replacement duration. Australian workers' compensation claimants with LBP and at least one day of wage replacement were included. We used group-based trajectory modelling to identify opioid dispensing patterns over a two and half year period from reported LBP onset and quantile regression to compare wage replacement duration betw...
Source
#1Giovanni E Ferreira (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 11
#2Rachelle Buchbinder (Monash University)H-Index: 123
Last. Lidia Carballo-CostaH-Index: 1
view all 8 authors...
Objective To describe the proportion of national health surveys that contained questions on the prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal conditions. Methods We used a comprehensive search strategy to obtain national health surveys from the 218 countries listed by the World Bank. Two authors independently extracted information from each national health survey. Outcomes were the proportion of surveys that: (i) contained questions on the prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions using the Glob...
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#1Michael Di DonatoH-Index: 2
#2Ross IlesH-Index: 9
Last. Alex CollieH-Index: 51
view all 5 authors...
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#1Michael Di Donato (Monash University)H-Index: 2
#2Ting Xia (Monash University)H-Index: 6
Last. Alex Collie (Monash University)H-Index: 51
view all 5 authors...
Introduction null When unable to work due to low back pain a worker may seek income support and funding for healthcare from an income support system such as workers’ compensation. Clinical practice guidelines recommend opioids for low back pain are only used for a short duration, at a low dose and with a plan to cease use. null Objectives null This study aimed to identify patterns of opioid dispensing in Australian workers with low back pain and determine the association of dispensing patterns w...
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#1Chang Liu (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 1
#2Christina Abdel Shaheed (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 8
Last. Chung-Wei Christine Lin (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 39
view all 10 authors...
Source
#8Bert Aertgeerts (Cochrane Collaboration)H-Index: 34
Abstract null Clinical question null What is the role of medical cannabis or cannabinoids for people living with chronic pain due to cancer or non-cancer causes? null Current practice null Chronic pain is common and distressing and associated with considerable socioeconomic burden globally. Medical cannabis is increasingly used to manage chronic pain, particularly in jurisdictions that have enacted policies to reduce use of opioids; however, existing guideline recommendations are inconsistent, a...
Source
#1Li Wang (McMaster University)H-Index: 27
#2Patrick Jiho Hong (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 7
Last. Alka Kaushal (UM: University of Manitoba)H-Index: 9
view all 21 authors...
Abstract null Objective null To determine the benefits and harms of medical cannabis and cannabinoids for chronic pain. null Design null Systematic review and meta-analysis. null Data sources null MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycInfo, CENTRAL, CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science, Cannabis-Med, Epistemonikos, and trial registries up to January 2021. null Study selection null Randomised clinical trials of medical cannabis or cannabinoids versus any non-cannabis control for chronic pain at ≥1 month follow-up...
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