John L. Fitzpatrick
Stockholm University
Mating systemReproductive successSexual selectionFemale sperm storageCooperative breedingDemographyPredationEcologySperm competitionSperm motilityInbreedingCichlidNeolamprologus pulcherSpermBiological sciencesMatingMate choiceReproductionEvolutionary biologySelection (genetic algorithm)BiologyHuman fertilizationZoology
97Publications
33H-index
2,926Citations
Publications 97
Newest
#1Ariel F. Kahrl (Stockholm University)H-Index: 6
#2Rhonda R. Snook (Stockholm University)H-Index: 32
Last. John L. Fitzpatrick (Stockholm University)H-Index: 33
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Evolutionary biologists have endeavoured to explain the extraordinary diversity of sperm morphology across animals for more than a century. One hypothesis to explain sperm diversity is that sperm length is shaped by the environment where fertilization takes place (that is, fertilization mode). Evolutionary transitions in fertilization modes may transform how selection acts on sperm length, probably by affecting postcopulatory mechanisms of sperm competition and the scope for cryptic female choic...
1 CitationsSource
#1Raïssa A. de Boer (Stockholm University)H-Index: 5
#2Regina Vega-Trejo (Stockholm University)H-Index: 8
Last. John L. Fitzpatrick (Stockholm University)H-Index: 33
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Animals are usually expected to avoid mating with relatives (kin avoidance) as incestuous mating can lead to the expression of inbreeding depression. Yet, theoretical models predict that unbiased mating with regards to kinship should be common, and that under some conditions, the inclusive fitness benefits associated with inbreeding can even lead to a preference for mating with kin. This mismatch between empirical and theoretical expectations generates uncertainty as to the prevalence of inbreed...
1 CitationsSource
#1Charel Reuland (Stockholm University)H-Index: 2
#2Leigh W. Simmons (UWA: University of Western Australia)H-Index: 98
Last. John L. Fitzpatrick (Stockholm University)H-Index: 33
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In polyandrous species, males face reproductive competition both before and after mating. Sexual selection thus shapes the evolution of both pre- and postcopulatory traits, creating competing demands on resource allocation to different reproductive episodes. Traits subject to strong selection exhibit accelerated rates of phenotypic divergence, and examining evolutionary rates may inform us about the relative importance and potential fitness consequences of investing in traits under either pre- o...
2 CitationsSource
#1Alessandro Devigili (Stockholm University)H-Index: 9
#2Erika Fernlund Isaksson (Stockholm University)H-Index: 1
Last. John L. Fitzpatrick (Stockholm University)H-Index: 33
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Variation in biotic and abiotic factors among populations affects individual behaviors by transforming the social landscape and shaping mating systems. Consequently, describing behaviors in natural populations requires consideration of the biological and physical factors that different individuals face. Here, we examined variation in socio-sexual and locomotor behaviors in a small, livebearing, freshwater fish, the pygmy halfbeak Dermogenys collettei, across natural populations in Singapore. The...
Source
#1Charel ReulandH-Index: 2
#2Brett M. CulbertH-Index: 5
Last. John L. FitzpatrickH-Index: 33
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Source
#1Charel Reuland (Stockholm University)H-Index: 2
#2Brett M. Culbert (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 5
Last. John L. Fitzpatrick (Stockholm University)H-Index: 33
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Higher social status is expected to result in fitness benefits as it secures access to potential mates. In promiscuous species, male reproductive success is also determined by an individual's ability to compete for fertilization after mating by producing high-quality ejaculates. However, the complex relationship between a male's investment in social status and ejaculates remains unclear. Here, we examine how male social status influences ejaculate quality under a range of social contexts in the ...
1 CitationsSource
Sperm competition is a powerful selective force that has shaped sexual traits throughout animal evolution. Yet, how fertilization mode (i.e. external versus internal fertilization) influences the scope and potential for sperm competition to act on ejaculates remains unclear. Here, I examine how fertilization mode shapes ejaculatory responses to sperm competition in fishes, a diverse group that constitute the majority of vertebrate biological diversity. Fishes are an ideal group for this examinat...
8 CitationsSource
#1Stefan Lüpold (UZH: University of Zurich)H-Index: 27
#2Raïssa A. de Boer (Stockholm University)H-Index: 5
Last. John L. Fitzpatrick (Stockholm University)H-Index: 33
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Females of many species mate with multiple males, thereby inciting competition among ejaculates from rival males for fertilization. In response to increasing sperm competition, males are predicted to enhance their investment in sperm production. This prediction is so widespread that testes size (correcting for body size) is commonly used as a proxy of sperm competition, even in the absence of any other information about a species' reproductive behaviour. By contrast, a debate about whether sperm...
21 CitationsSource
#1Wouter van der Bijl (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 9
#2Dirk Zeuss (University of Marburg)H-Index: 9
Last. Christopher W. Wheat (Stockholm University)H-Index: 31
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Sexual dimorphism is typically thought to result from sexual selection for elaborated male traits, as proposed by Darwin. However, natural selection could reduce expression of elaborated traits in females, as proposed by Wallace. Darwin and Wallace debated the origins of dichromatism in birds and butterflies, and although evidence in birds is roughly equal, if not in favor of Wallace's model, butterflies lack a similar scale of study. Here, we present a large-scale comparative phylogenetic analy...
5 CitationsSource
#1John L. Fitzpatrick (University of Manchester)H-Index: 33
#2C. Daisy Bridge (University of Manchester)H-Index: 1
Last. Rhonda R. Snook (Stockholm University)H-Index: 32
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Spermatozoa are the most morphologically diverse cell type, leading to the widespread assumption that they evolve rapidly. However, there is no direct evidence that sperm evolve faster than other m...
3 CitationsSource