Daniel T. Gilbert
Harvard University
EpistemologyPsychoanalysisFeelingSocial perceptionSocial relationDevelopmental psychologyAttributionSociologySocial psychology (sociology)PsychologyCognitionImpact biasCognitive psychologyCognitive biasEvent (relativity)PleasureDuration (philosophy)Affective forecastingHappinessPsycINFOKnow-howAffect (psychology)Social psychologySocial cognitionInformation processing
132Publications
65H-index
24.9kCitations
Publications 122
Newest
#1Adam M. Mastroianni (Harvard University)H-Index: 2
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
view all 4 authors...
Do conversations end when people want them to? Surprisingly, behavioral science provides no answer to this fundamental question about the most ubiquitous of all human social activities. In two studies of 932 conversations, we asked conversants to report when they had wanted a conversation to end and to estimate when their partner (who was an intimate in Study 1 and a stranger in Study 2) had wanted it to end. Results showed that conversations almost never ended when both conversants wanted them ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Erin C. Westgate (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 12
#2Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
view all 5 authors...
When left to their own devices, people could choose to enjoy their own thoughts. But recent work suggests they do not. When given the freedom, people do not spontaneously choose to think for pleasure, and when directed to do so, struggle to concentrate successfully. Moreover, people find it somewhat boring and much less enjoyable than other solitary activities. One reason for this is that people may not know how to think for pleasure. Specifically, they may not know what to think about to make t...
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#1Jordi Quoidbach (Ramon Llull University)H-Index: 20
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Harris and Busseri [Harris, H., & Busseri, M.A. (2019). Is there an ‘end of history illusion’ for life satisfaction? Evidence from a three-wave longitudinal study. Journal of Research in Personality, 83, 103869] examined the changes in life satisfaction people predicted vs. experienced for 30-years based on the three waves of the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) survey. They conclude that “Contrary to the EOHI [end of history illusion], most individuals either were accurate or antic...
2 CitationsSource
#1Nick Buttrick (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 8
#2Hyewon Choi (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 7
Last. Daniela C. Wilks (University of Porto)H-Index: 6
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: Which is more enjoyable: trying to think enjoyable thoughts or doing everyday solitary activities? Wilson et al. (2014) found that American participants much preferred solitary everyday activities, such as reading or watching TV, to thinking for pleasure. To see whether this preference generalized outside of the United States, we replicated the study with 2,557 participants from 12 sites in 11 countries. The results were consistent in every country: Participants randomly assigned to do somethi...
6 CitationsSource
#1A Vallance (RCS: Royal College of Surgeons of England)H-Index: 10
#2D. P. Harji (RVI: Royal Victoria Infirmary)H-Index: 2
Last. Haney Youssef (HEFT: Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust)H-Index: 12
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Abstract Aim The IMPACT (Improving the Management of Patients with Advanced Colorectal Tumours) initiative was established by the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland in 2017 as a consortium of surgeons (colorectal, hepatobiliary, thoracic), oncologists, radiologists, pathologists, palliative care physicians, patients, carers and charity stakeholders who will work together to improve outcomes in patients with advanced and metastatic colorectal cancer. To establish this init...
6 CitationsSource
#1Jeremy M. WolfeH-Index: 81
Last. David E. LevariH-Index: 1
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#1Timothy D. Wilson (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 78
#2Erin C. Westgate (UVA: University of Virginia)H-Index: 12
Last. Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
view all 4 authors...
Abstract This chapter is concerned with a type of thinking that has received little attention, namely intentional “thinking for pleasure”—the case in which people deliberately focus solely on their thoughts with the goal of generating positive affect. We present a model that describes why it is difficult to enjoy one's thoughts, how it can be done successfully, and when there is value in doing so. We review 36 studies we have conducted on this topic with just over 10,000 participants. We found t...
5 CitationsSource
#2B. CarlusH-Index: 1
Last. M. Rosas-CarbajalH-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
Summary The fact that the earth is constantly bombarded by an isotropic flux of cosmic rays has permitted to develop a new detection method that can only look over the observation point, but powerful enough to detect anomalies in front of a tunnel boring machine (TBM) digging a gallery. To do that, a cosmic ray detector, a muons telescope is set up on a TBM, looking towards. Cosmic radiations generate very short-lived particles in the upper atmosphere, muons, whose diameter is small enough to pe...
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#1David E. Levari (Harvard University)H-Index: 1
#2Daniel T. Gilbert (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
Last. Thalia Wheatley (Dartmouth College)H-Index: 30
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Why do some social problems seem so intractable? In a series of experiments, we show that people often respond to decreases in the prevalence of a stimulus by expanding their concept of it. When blue dots became rare, participants began to see purple dots as blue; when threatening faces became rare, participants began to see neutral faces as threatening; and when unethical requests became rare, participants began to see innocuous requests as unethical. This “prevalence-induced concept change” oc...
27 CitationsSource
#1P. De SloowereH-Index: 1
#2B. CarlusH-Index: 1
Last. M. Rosas-CarbajalH-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
1 CitationsSource