Nathan Novemsky
Yale University
Risk aversion (psychology)Product (category theory)PsychologyEconomicsMicroeconomicsSocial comparison theoryCognitive psychologyConsumer behaviourConstrual level theoryConsumer choiceLoss aversionContext (language use)SalientPersuasionSession (computer science)Poison controlAffect (psychology)Opportunity costSocial psychologyAdaptation (computer science)
35Publications
17H-index
2,028Citations
Publications 34
Newest
#1Ernest BaskinH-Index: 9
#2Nathan NovemskyH-Index: 17
Last. Robyn A. LeBoeufH-Index: 14
view all 3 authors...
#1Ernest Baskin (""St. Joe's"": Saint Joseph's University)H-Index: 9
#2Margarita Gorlin (Yale University)H-Index: 5
Last. Michelle Hatzis (Google)H-Index: 1
view all 7 authors...
Abstract In an effort to bolster employee satisfaction, many employers provide free snacks at the office. Unfortunately, keeping employees happy can conflict with the goal of keeping them healthy, since increased snacking at work can contribute to overeating and obesity. Building on the growing body of research in choice architecture, we tested one factor that might influence snack consumption without impacting satisfaction: the relative distance between snacks and beverages. In a large field st...
22 CitationsSource
#1Ernest BaskinH-Index: 9
#2Cheryl J. WakslakH-Index: 22
Last. Nathan NovemskyH-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
1 Citations
#1Ernest BaskinH-Index: 9
#2Nathan NovemskyH-Index: 17
Last. Ravi DharH-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
2 Citations
#1Ernest Baskin (Yale University)H-Index: 9
#2Cheryl J. Wakslak (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 22
Last. Nathan Novemsky (Yale University)H-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
This article looks at the trade-offs that gift givers and gift receivers make between desirability and feasibility using construal level theory as a framework. Focusing on the asymmetric distance from a gift that exists within giver-receiver dyads, the authors propose that, unlike receivers, givers construe gifts abstractly and therefore weight desirability attributes more than feasibility attributes. Support for this proposition emerges in studies examining giver and receiver mind-sets, as well...
87 CitationsSource
#1Jongmin KimH-Index: 1
#2Nathan NovemskyH-Index: 17
Last. Ravi DharH-Index: 51
view all 4 authors...
#1Jongmin KimH-Index: 1
#2Nathan NovemskyH-Index: 17
Last. Ravi DharH-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
#1Jongmin Kim (Singapore Management University)H-Index: 1
#2Nathan Novemsky (Yale University)H-Index: 17
Last. Ravi Dhar (Yale University)H-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
Similarity plays a critical role in many judgments and choices. Traditional models of similarity posit that increasing the number of differences between objects cannot increase judged similarity between them. In contrast to these previous models, the present research shows that introducing a small difference in an attribute that previously was identical across objects can increase perceived similarity between those objects. We propose an explanation based on the idea that small differences draw ...
10 CitationsSource
#1Jongmin KimH-Index: 1
#2Nathan NovemskyH-Index: 17
Last. Ravi DharH-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
#1Jing Wang (Singapore Management University)H-Index: 3
#2Nathan Novemsky (Yale University)H-Index: 17
Last. Roy F. Baumeister (FSU: Florida State University)H-Index: 138
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Four experiments examine why choices deplete executive resources. The authors show that the resolution of trade-offs is a driver of depletion effects arising from choice, and the larger the trade-offs, the greater is the depletion effect. The authors also find that choice difficulty not related to trade-offs does not influence the depleting effect of the choices. Finally, the authors find that though people can intuit some depletion effects, they do not intuit that choices or trade-offs...
127 CitationsSource