Alexander Todorov
University of Chicago
TraitValence (psychology)Social perceptionDevelopmental psychologyTrustworthinessPsychologyFace perceptionCognitionImpression formationCognitive psychologyPersonalityFacial expressionPerceptionAmygdalaFace (sociological concept)Context (language use)AttractivenessAffect (psychology)Social psychologySocial cognition
163Publications
67H-index
13kCitations
Publications 157
Newest
#1Alexander TodorovH-Index: 2
#1Alexander TodorovH-Index: 1
Last. Virginia FalvelloH-Index: 4
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#1Virginie C. Pointet (University of Geneva)H-Index: 2
#2Dominik Andrea Moser (UNIL: University of Lausanne)
Last. Daniel S. Schechter (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 21
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Introduction: The present study investigates the association of lifetime interpersonal violence exposure (IPV), related posttraumatic stress disorder (IPV-PTSD), and appraisal of the degree of threat posed by facial avatars. Methods: We recorded self-rated responses and high-density electroencephalography (HD-EEG) among women, 16 of whom with lifetime IPV-PTSD and 14 with no PTSD, during a face-evaluation task that displayed male face-avatars varying in their degree of threat as rated along dime...
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#1Stefan Uddenberg (Princeton University)H-Index: 3
#1Stefan Uddenberg (Princeton University)H-Index: 1
Last. Alexander Todorov (Princeton University)H-Index: 67
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#1Runnan Cao (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 2
#2Jinge Wang (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 3
Last. Shuo Wang (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 13
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Neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) that are selective for the identity of specific people are classically thought to encode identity invariant to visual features. However, it remains largely unknown how visual information from higher visual cortex is translated into a semantic representation of an individual person. Here, we show that some MTL neurons are selective to multiple different face identities on the basis of shared features that form clusters in the representation of a dee...
2 CitationsSource
#1Bastian Jaeger (Tilburg University)H-Index: 8
#2Alexander Todorov (Princeton University)H-Index: 67
Last. Ilja van Beest (Tilburg University)H-Index: 24
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Trait impressions from faces influence many consequential decisions even in situations in which they have poor diagnostic value and in which decisions should not be based on a person’s appearance. Here, we test (a) whether people rely on facial appearance when making legal sentencing decisions and (b) whether two types of interventions—educating decision-makers and changing the accessibility of facial information—reduces the influence of facial stereotypes. We first introduce a novel legal decis...
5 CitationsSource
#1DongWon Oh (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 4
Last. Alexander Todorov (Princeton University)H-Index: 67
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Women prefer male faces with feminine shape and masculine reflectance. Here, we investigated the conceptual correlates of this preference, showing that it might reflect women's preferences for feminine (vs. masculine) personality in a partner. Young heterosexual women reported their preferences for personality traits in a partner and rated male faces-manipulated on masculinity/femininity-on stereotypically masculine (e.g., dominance) and feminine traits (e.g., warmth). Masculine shape and reflec...
2 CitationsSource
#1Runnan Cao (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 2
#2Xin Li (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 2
Last. Shuo Wang (WVU: West Virginia University)H-Index: 13
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#1Joel E. Martinez (Princeton University)H-Index: 5
#2Friederike Funk (University of Cologne)H-Index: 6
Last. Alexander Todorov (Princeton University)H-Index: 67
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Identifying relative idiosyncratic and shared contributions to judgments is a fundamental challenge to the study of human behavior, yet there is no established method for estimating these contributions. Using edge cases of stimuli varying in intrarater reliability and interrater agreement—faces (high on both), objects (high on the former, low on the latter), and complex patterns (low on both)—we showed that variance component analyses (VCAs) accurately captured the psychometric properties of the...
3 CitationsSource
#1Katia Mattarozzi (UNIBO: University of Bologna)H-Index: 5
#1Katia Mattarozzi (UNIBO: University of Bologna)H-Index: 15
Last. Alexander Todorov (Princeton University)H-Index: 67
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Trait inferences based solely on facial appearance affect many social decisions. Here we tested whether the effects of such inferences extend to the perception of physical sensations. In an actual clinical setting, we show that healthcare providers' facial appearance is a strong predictor of pain experienced by patients during a medical procedure. The effect was specific to familiarity: facial features of healthcare providers that convey feelings of familiarity were associated with a decrease in...
1 CitationsSource
#1DongWon Oh (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 4
#2Eldar Shafir (Princeton University)H-Index: 47
Last. Alexander Todorov (Princeton University)H-Index: 67
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Impressions of competence from faces predict important real-world outcomes, including electoral success and chief executive officer selection. Presumed competence is associated with social status. Here we show that subtle economic status cues in clothes affect perceived competence from faces. In nine studies, people rated the competence of faces presented in frontal headshots. Faces were shown with different upper-body clothing rated by independent judges as looking ‘richer’ or ‘poorer’, althoug...
10 CitationsSource