Hauke Bartsch
University of California, San Diego
Developmental psychologyCognitive developmentPathologyMagnetic resonance imagingDiffusion MRIArtificial intelligencePsychologyNeuroscienceCognitionNeurocognitiveHuman brainVisual cortexProstate cancerCerebral cortexWhite matterNuclear medicineSpectrum imagingComputer visionComputer scienceNeuroimagingMedicineFractional anisotropy
95Publications
28H-index
3,578Citations
Publications 92
Newest
#1Krista M. Lisdahl (UWM: University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)H-Index: 16
#2Susan F. Tapert (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 89
Last. Kelah F. Hatcher (UWM: University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)H-Index: 1
view all 112 authors...
Abstract null null Background null The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development ™ Study (ABCD Study®) is an open-science, multi-site, prospective, longitudinal study following over 11,800 9- and 10-year-old youth into early adulthood. The ABCD Study aims to prospectively examine the impact of substance use (SU) on neurocognitive and health outcomes. Although SU initiation typically occurs during teen years, relatively little is known about patterns of SU in children younger than 12. null null null...
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#1Ana E. Rodríguez-Soto (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 8
#2Lauren K. Fang (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 1
Last. Rebecca Rakow-Penner (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 13
view all 13 authors...
BACKGROUND Diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar imaging (EPI) is prone to geometric distortions due to B0 inhomogeneities. Both prospective and retrospective approaches have been developed to decrease and correct such distortions. PURPOSE The purpose of this work was to evaluate the performance of reduced-field-of-view (FOV) acquisition and retrospective distortion correction methods in decreasing distortion artifacts for breast imaging. Coverage of the axilla in reduced-FOV DW magnetic resonance...
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#1Peter F.A. Mulders (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 79
#2Alberto Llera (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 12
Last. Indira Tendolkar (Radboud University Nijmegen)H-Index: 44
view all 27 authors...
Abstract Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, so understanding whether its clinical effect relates to structural brain changes is vital for current and future antidepressant research. Objective To determine whether clinical response to ECT is related to structural volumetric changes in the brain as measured by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and, if so, which regions are related to this clinical effect. We al...
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#1Miriam Scadeng (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 32
#2Christina M McKenzie (U of G: University of Guelph)H-Index: 2
Last. Judy St. Leger (Cornell University)H-Index: 3
view all 7 authors...
: The arapaima is the largest of the extant air-breathing freshwater fishes. Their respiratory gas bladder is arguably the most striking of all the adaptations to living in the hypoxic waters of the Amazon basin, in which dissolved oxygen can reach 0 ppm (0 mg/l) at night. As obligatory air-breathers, arapaima have undergone extensive anatomical and physiological adaptations in almost every organ system. These changes were evaluated using magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging, gross...
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#1Donald J. Hagler (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 90
#2Sean N. Hatton (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 24
Last. Michael P. Harms (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)H-Index: 37
view all 143 authors...
Abstract The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study is an ongoing, nationwide study of the effects of environmental influences on behavioral and brain development in adolescents. The main objective of the study is to recruit and assess over eleven thousand 9-10-year-olds and follow them over the course of 10 years to characterize normative brain and cognitive development, the many factors that influence brain development, and the effects of those factors on mental health and other o...
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#1Miklos Argyelan (The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research)H-Index: 24
#2Leif Oltedal (University of Bergen)H-Index: 15
Last. Christopher C. Abbott (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 18
view all 30 authors...
Electroconvulsive therapy, or ECT for short, can be an effective treatment for severe depression. Many patients who do not respond to medication find that their symptoms improve after ECT. During an ECT session, the patient is placed under general anesthesia and two electrodes are attached to the scalp to produce an electric field that generates currents within the brain. These currents activate neurons and make them fire, causing a seizure, but it remains unclear how this reduces symptoms of de...
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#1Miklos Argyelan (The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research)H-Index: 24
#2Leif Oltedal (University of Bergen)H-Index: 15
Last. Christopher C. Abbott (UNM: University of New Mexico)H-Index: 18
view all 30 authors...
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#1Stefan AppelhoffH-Index: 8
#2Julianna F. BatesH-Index: 11
Last. Tal YarkoniH-Index: 49
view all 31 authors...
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#1Emilie T. ReasH-Index: 13
#2Donald J. HaglerH-Index: 90
Last. James B. BrewerH-Index: 54
view all 11 authors...
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#5Benjamin S. C. Wade (UC: University of California)H-Index: 8
Abstract Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with volumetric enlargements of corticolimbic brain regions. However, the pattern of whole-brain structural alterations following ECT remains unresolved. Here, we examined the longitudinal effects of ECT on global and local variations in gray matter, white matter, and ventricle volumes in patients with major depressive disorder as well as predictors of ECT-related clinical response. Methods Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging ...
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