Amy L. McKenzie
University of Connecticut
Internal medicineEndocrinologyAnimal scienceRandomized controlled trialChemistryKetosisType 2 diabetesPrediabetesUrineGlycemicIntervention (counseling)Hydration statusFluid intakeObesityCyclingWeight lossDiabetes mellitusMedicineBody waterGastroenterology
78Publications
14H-index
701Citations
Publications 74
Newest
#1Rebecca N. AdamsH-Index: 14
Last. Amy L. McKenzieH-Index: 14
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#1Amy L. McKenzieH-Index: 14
Last. Robert E. RatnerH-Index: 61
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#1Brittanie M. VolkH-Index: 13
Last. Robert E. RatnerH-Index: 61
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Background: Prediabetes phenotypes differ based on whether an individual exhibits impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or both. The traditional diabetes prevention approach focused on weight loss via fat/caloric restriction and exercise appears less effective in those with IFG. Given that even transient regression to normal glucose regulation is associated with reduced risk of progression to type 2 diabetes, interventions that elicit normal fasting glucose (NFG) may ...
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#1Amy L. McKenzieH-Index: 14
Last. Sarah Hallberg (Indiana University Health)H-Index: 5
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The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of an alternative approach to type 2 diabetes prevention. Ninety-six patients with prediabetes (age 52 (10) years; 80% female; BMI 39.2 (7.1) kg/m2) received a continuous remote care intervention focused on reducing hyperglycemia through carbohydrate restricted nutrition therapy for two years in a single arm, prospective, longitudinal pilot study. Two-year retention was 75% (72 of 96 participants). Fifty-one percent of participants (49 of 96) me...
4 CitationsSource
Metabolic syndrome is characterized by insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia (elevated triglycerides, low HDL), and hyperglycemia. The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome ...
1 CitationsSource
#2Sarah Hallberg (IUPUI: Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis)H-Index: 5
Last. Ronald M. Krauss (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 138
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#1Katharina LechnerH-Index: 4
#2Amy L. McKenzieH-Index: 14
Last. Nicolai WormH-Index: 2
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#2Sarah Hallberg (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 5
Last. Ronald M. Krauss (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 138
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BACKGROUND We have previously reported that in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) consumption of a very low carbohydrate diet capable of inducing nutritional ketosis over 2 years (continuous care intervention, CCI) resulted in improved body weight, glycemic control, and multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) with the exception of an increase in low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). In the present study, we report the impact of this intervention on markers of risk for athe...
12 CitationsSource
#2Rebecca N. AdamsH-Index: 14
Last. Amy L. McKenzieH-Index: 14
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Background: Only about half of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) achieve the HbA1c Methods: Adults with T2D selected to receive the CCI (n=262) or usual care (UC; n=87). We utilized GEE to assess change in the proportion of patients at HbA1c Results: The proportion of CCI patients meeting the HbA1c Conclusion: This suggests the CCI is an effective means to help more patients achieve the HbA1c Disclosure S.J. Athinarayanan: Employee; Self; Virta Health Corp. R.N. Adams: Employee; Self; Virta He...
1 CitationsSource