Deborah A. Small
University of Pennsylvania
WelfareAdvertisingFeelingAttributionBusinessPsychologyProsocial behaviorEconomicsRisk perceptionCognitive psychologyNegotiationConsumer behaviourControl (management)DonationPriming (media)Value (ethics)SympathyAngerSadnessGenerosityAltruism (biology)Open dataPoison controlNormativeAltruismSocial psychology
76Publications
30H-index
5,589Citations
Publications 68
Newest
#1Alixandra BaraschH-Index: 11
#2Emma LevineH-Index: 10
Last. Deborah A. SmallH-Index: 30
view all 5 authors...
#1Deborah A. SmallH-Index: 30
4 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Z. Berman (LBS: London Business School)H-Index: 8
#2Emma Levine (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
view all 4 authors...
People often brag about, or advertise, their good deeds to others. Seven studies investigate how bragging about prosocial behavior affects perceived generosity. The authors propose that bragging conveys information about an actor's good deeds, leading to an attribution of generosity. However, bragging also signals a selfish motivation (a desire for credit) that undermines the attribution of generosity. Thus, bragging has a positive effect when prosocial behavior is unknown because it informs oth...
61 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan Z. BermanH-Index: 8
#2Alixandra BaraschH-Index: 11
Last. Deborah A. SmallH-Index: 30
view all 4 authors...
1 Citations
#1Alixandra Barasch (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 11
#2Emma Levine (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
view all 4 authors...
Theories that reject the existence of altruism presume that emotional benefits serve as ulterior motives for doing good deeds. These theories argue that even in the absence of material and reputational benefits, individuals reap utility from the feelings associated with doing good. In response to this normative view of altruism, this article examines the descriptive question of whether laypeople penalize emotional prosocial actors. Six studies find that emotion serves as a positive signal of mor...
66 CitationsSource
#1Alixandra BaraschH-Index: 11
#2Jonathan Z. BermanH-Index: 8
Last. Deborah A. SmallH-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
3 Citations
#1Fern Lin-Healy (AU: Auburn University)H-Index: 2
#2Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
True altruism involves sacrifice and is thus incompatible, in people’s minds, with benefits to the benefactor. Consistent with this prototype, selflessly motivated prosocial actors are perceived as less likely to benefit from their acts compared with selfishly motivated actors (“Nice guys finish last”), and prosocial actors who benefit are perceived as less benevolent than those who do not (“Guys in last are nice”)—even in situations for which benefits are randomly determined and completely out ...
34 CitationsSource
#1Emma Levine (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 10
#2Alixandra Barasch (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 11
Last. Deborah A. Small (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 30
view all 4 authors...
Individuals in organizations are often motivated to appear altruistic. In the current research, we examine whether being emotional is an effective signal of altruistic character. Three studies find...
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