Eiji Minami
Kyoto University
XylanSupercritical fluidDiesel fuelNuclear chemistryCarbonizationCatalysisOrganic chemistryChemistryMaterials scienceHemicelluloseBeechAcetic acidHydrocarbonCelluloseBiomassMethanolDecarboxylationHardwoodFagus crenataLigninOxidative cleavagePyrolysisEnvironmental scienceChemical engineeringBiodieselFatty acidYield (chemistry)Waste managementBiodiesel productionSoftwoodHydrolysis
47Publications
13H-index
1,185Citations
Publications 49
Newest
#1Jiawei Wang (Kyoto University)H-Index: 2
#2Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
Last. Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
The thermal degradation reactivities of cellulose and hemicellulose are substantially different in Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica, a softwood) and Japanese beech (Fagus crenata, a hardwood). Uronic acid and its salts act as acid and base catalysts, respectively, and their specific placement in the cell walls has been considered a factor that influences degradation reactivity. In this study, the role of lignin in degradation reactivity was investigated using holocellulose prepared from ceda...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jiawei Wang (Kyoto University)H-Index: 2
#2Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
Last. Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
view all 4 authors...
The thermal degradation reactivities of hemicellulose and cellulose in wood cell walls are significantly different from the thermal degradation behavior of the respective isolated components. Furthermore, the degradation of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica, a softwood) is distinct from that of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata, a hardwood). Lignin and uronic acid are believed to play crucial roles in governing this behavior. In this study, the effects of ball milling for various durations of tim...
1 CitationsSource
#1Masatsugu Takada (Kyoto University)H-Index: 4
#2Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
Last. Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
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The topochemistry of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) wood delignification was evaluated in this study following a supercritical methanol treatment (270 °C, 27 MPa). Ultraviolet microscopic analysis of the insoluble residue revealed that the lignin in the secondary wall was easily decomposed and removed because of the preferential cleavage of ether-type linkages. In contrast, the middle lamella lignin was initially resistant to supercritical methanol but eventually decomposed and was removed. In a...
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#1Yilin Yao (Kyoto University)
#2Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
Last. Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
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#1Latifa Seniorita (Kyoto University)H-Index: 1
#2Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
Last. Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
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#1Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
#2Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
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#1Takashi Nomura (Kyoto University)H-Index: 2
#2Eiji Minami (Kyoto University)H-Index: 13
Last. Haruo Kawamoto (Kyoto University)H-Index: 37
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Hydrogen bond donor solvents such as aromatic solvents inhibit the secondary degradation of cellulose-derived primary pyrolysis products. In a previous study, we found that the formation of solid carbonized products was completely inhibited during cellulose pyrolysis in aromatic solvents, with 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) recovered in certain yields instead. This indicated that 5-HMF is an intermediate in cellulose carbonization. To confirm this hypothesis, the thermal reactivity of 5-HMF was...
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#1Takashi NomuraH-Index: 2
Last. Haruo KawamotoH-Index: 37
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The fast pyrolysis of cellulose produces levoglucosan (LG), but secondary pyrolysis reactions tend to reduce the yield. The present study assessed the fast pyrolysis of cellulose by infrared (IR) heating under nitrogen flow. Because the nitrogen was not efficiently heated, gaseous LG was immediately cooled, resulting in a maximum yield of 52.7% under optimized conditions. Slow nitrogen flow and a high IR power level provided a greater gas yield by raising the temperature of the cellulose, and th...
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#1Jiawei WangH-Index: 2
#2Eiji MinamiH-Index: 13
Last. Haruo KawamotoH-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
The thermal reactivities of cellulose and hemicellulose are significantly different in cell walls when compared with isolated components and differ in Japanese cedar (softwood) and Japanese beech (hardwood). Uronic acid bound to xylan promotes the thermal degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and its effect is different depending on the form of free acid (acting as an acid catalyst) or metal uronate (acting as a base catalyst). We evaluated the location of uronic acid in the cell wall by i...
2 CitationsSource